Category Archives: d-democratic

English bulletin March 1, 2021

AFRICAN UNION AND CULTURE OF PEACE

The African Union (AU) increasingly promotes a culture of peace on the continent.

As described in a new book by Kathryn Nash, the African Union has developed, since its beginning at the turn of the century, a conflict management policy that was not available to its predecessor, the Organization of African Unity. Currently, the AU deploys monitors, authorizes peace support operations, and actively engages to resolve internal conflicts.

The 34th Session of the African Union Summit ended on 7 February 2021 with the new Chair, President Felix Tshisekedi of the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC), outlining an ambitious agenda, including combating climate change, expediting regional integration, investing in human capital, promoting Africa’s culture, empowering women and youth, and accelerating the operationalization of the African Continental Free Trade Area (AfCFTA).

One of the priorites mentioned by President Tshisekedi is the “Silencing the Guns” campaign, which has been extended to 2030, and now consists of a roadmap and practical steps to achieve its objectives. There will be a two-year periodic review of implementation.

As part of Youth Silencing the Guns Campaign, the Office of the Youth Envoy (OYE) in collaboration with partners has recently provided grants to four youth projects:
– Silencing the Climate Crisis Award to project Ibn El Bitar (Algeria)
– Silencing Gender-Based Violence Award to #ShutItAllDown movement (Namibia)
– Silencing Corruption Award
to Citizens Gavel Foundation for Social Justice (Nigeria)
– Silencing Youth Unemployment Award
to Garden of Hope Foundation (Kenya)

Another recent initiative of the AU Office of the Youth Envoy has been the virtual meetings of women activists in the five regions of Africa, which resulted in a Africa Young Women’s Manifesto. The Manifesto is a comprehensive document addressing all aspects of the culture of peace.

The African Continental Free Trade Area (AfCFTA), mentioned as a priority for the AU, began operation on January 1, 2021. This may become an important contribution to the culture of peace on the continent as it may transform conflicts across the continent by reducing the incentives for participating in conflicts, via the creation of jobs. AfCFTA has the potential to promote women’s equality in Africa as stated in remarks to the AU Summit by outgoing President Cyril Ramaphosa. He stated that state parties would report annually on progress made in strengthening women’s participation in continental trade matters. “This includes tailor made financial products for women with reliable means to save, access, transfer and borrow money.” He called for a “women-led Peace Forum to be attended by Heads of State and Government and to implement decisions of the Peace and Security Council to institutionalise the office of the special envoy on women, peace and security.”

In his remarks to the AU summit, incoming President Felix Tshisekedi also confirmed the AU participation in the 2nd Biennale of Luanda on the Culture of Peace to be held in Angola in September, 2021 (see the many articles on this in CPNN). The strategic objective of the Biennale is to promote a peaceful and prosperous Africa through the defense and encouragement of actions that prevent conflicts in the management of national and cross-border natural resources on the African continent, as well as to educate a generation of young Africans as agents of peace, stability and development. The theme of the event this year will be: “Art, Culture and Heritage: Levers to build the Africa we want”.

In her analysis of the African Union, Kathryn Nash Nash argues that the devlopment of its conflict management policy largely happened within the African context, and international pressure was not a determinant factor in its evolution. If the AU continues its independent development, it has a chance to escape from the culture of war that was imposed by the old colonial powers and that is maintained by the economic exploitation of Africa by the empires of Europe, United States and China. The development of the new continental free trade zone can help protect this independence and enable an Africa in peace.

DISARMAMENT & SECURITY



Book review: African peace: Regional norms from the Organization of African Unity to the African Union

FREE FLOW OF INFORMATION



Central Africa: Ambassador Sita José Analyzes Luanda Biennial With ECCAS Commissioner

SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT



New UNEP synthesis provides blueprint to urgently solve planetary emergencies and secure humanity’s future

DEMOCRATIC PARTICIPATION



Colombia: Cultural spaces for the construction of peace

In addition to articles, we list virtual events for the culture of peace: Click here for upcoming events. Last month we registered 23 virtual events.

  

HUMAN RIGHTS




New ICC ruling ‘opens the door’ for justice in occupied Palestine – Independent UN expert

WOMEN’S EQUALITY



‘Women and girls belong in science’ declares UN chief  

TOLERANCE & SOLIDARITY


G5 Sahel: Heads of State announce Prize for the promotion of the culture of peace

EDUCATION FOR PEACE



Brazil: Culture of Peace in schools will be the subject of a webinar on February 18th

English bulletin November 1, 2020

CULTURE OF PEACE FLOURISHES IN AFRICA

Judging from the many articles from Africa in CPNN this monrth, the culture of peace is flourishing in Africa.

African Union (AU). The AU continues to provide leadership for a culture of peace throughout Africa, as we have followed in recent years in CPNN. This month the joint task force on peace and security of the AU with the United Nations held its 19th consultative meeting. The meeting discussed developments and cooperation in support to on-going electoral processes in Côte d’Ivoire, Ghana and Guinea. The meeting also exchanged views on the situations in Ethiopia, Libya, Mali, Somalia, South Sudan, Sudan and Western Sahara. 

The AU Youth Envoy, in cooperation with other African organizations, has sponsored this month a series of virtual events in five regions to develop the leadership capacities of young African women. Breakout groups discussed ecomomic rights and justice, sexual reproductive health and rights, climate justice, technology and innovation for feminist action, feminist movement and leadership, gender-based violence and “youth silencing the gun.”

The African First Ladies Peace Mission (AFLPM) plays a supportive role to the African Union as well as regional organizations and national governments in promoting a culture of peace and preventig conflicts. This month CPNN reprints an interview with the Special Assistant to the President concerning the work of the organization.

Côte d’Ivoire. Leading up to the national elections in Côte d’Ivoire, many sectors are working for a culture of peace to prevent a recurrence of the violence that has marred elections in previous years. This includes the Voice of Women, the traditional chiefs of Gagnoa, young Christian and Muslim leaders convened by the Fondation Félix Houphouët-Boigny pour la recherche de la paix and the musical group Les Héritiers du Zouglou. The culture of peace has deep roots in Côte d’Ivoire, since it was in Yamoussoukro in 1989 that the UNESCO culture of peace program was born. The Network of Foundations and Research Institutions for the Promotion of a Culture of Peace in Africa reprints each month the bulletin of CPNN.

Guinea. Also in Guinea to reduce violence in the pre-election period there is a mobilization of the civil society for a culture of peace. The NGO Conseil de Réflexion pour une Guinée Nouvelle ( CRGN) launched a campaign to guarantee an inclusive, peaceful, transparent and credible election and to sensitize and educate citizens on the culture of peace.

Nigeria. The candidates for governor in the forthcoming election in the state of Ondo have promised to embrace peace. They made the pledge at the signing of a peace accord organised by the National Peace Committee (NPC) in collaboration with the Independent National Electoral Commission (INEC).

Senegal. In Kedougou, near the borders of Mali and Guinea, the think tank Timbuktu Institute-African Center for Peace Studies Institute is launching an the initiative called “Resilience at the borders” to promote the culture of peace.

Liberia. Mariama H. Konneh, a young Liberian women’s rights advocate, has been selected to participate in the Global Peace Chain summit 2020 in Turkey. “By transferring knowledge and skills gained from the Global Peace Chain, I hope to build a network of youth activists committed to non-violence advocacy and values of tolerance and peaceful coexistence,” she said.

Niger. Organized by the NGO OXFAM, an awareness campaign has been launched to strengthen the participation of women and young people in the various inter-community dialogue frameworks.

Gabon. Dedicated to the prevention and resolution of conflicts in the sub-region of Central Africa, the creation of a network of “Young peace weavers” in Gabon, Chad and Cameroon was recently presented by the head of the United Nations System in Gabon, Dr. Stephen Jackson.

Burkina Faso. “Culture of peace, prevention and management of crises; guarantees of sustainable social cohesion ”: This is the theme of the 3rd edition of the “96 hours of the Center region,” launched in Ouagadougou.

The flourishing of the culture of peace in Africa has been stimulated and supported by UNESCO since the 1989 Yamoussoukro conference mentioned above. The UNESCO support has, if anything, increased in recent years as detailed in more than 40 CPNN articles.

DEMOCRATIC PARTICIPATION



Côte d’Ivoire : The traditional chiefs of Gagnoa call for peaceful elections

FREE FLOW OF INFORMATION



‘Democracy Has Won’: Year After Right-Wing Coup Against Evo Morales, Socialist Luis Arce Declares Victory in Bolivia Election

SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT



Montreal: Demonstration for “climate justice”

HUMAN RIGHTS




Comment by UN High Commissioner for Human Rights Michelle Bachelet on the Colombian Comprehensive System of Truth, Justice, Reparation and Non-Repetition

          

EDUCATION FOR PEACE



Mexico: Courses and training to build a culture of peace

WOMEN’S EQUALITY



Mairo Al-Makura African First Ladies Peace Mission is Serious Business

TOLERANCE & SOLIDARITY


Yamoussoukro, Côte d’Ivoire : Young Christian and Muslim leaders take action for peace

DISARMAMENT & SECURITY



Red Cross : Nuclear ban: “Today is an historic day. We call on world leaders to act with courage and join the right side of history”

English bulletin September 1, 2020

HOPE FOR THE US . .

In the face of pessimistic predictions, even to the point of civil war, there are progressive mobilizations in the United States.

Unionization . The public approval rating for unions has climbed to nearly its highest level in fifty years. There has also been a surge of unionization among adjunct professors, grad students, digital and print journalists, museum workers, nurses, cannabis store workers, and nonprofit employees.

Colleges and Universities .. Search for Common Ground has partnered with Soliya and Tiger 21 to implement an orientation program for first-year students that will facilitate intra-campus dialogue and build trust, respect, and constructive coexistence across differences.

Black Lives Matter .. The movement continues to mobilize, most recently in professional sports. Players of the Women’s National Basketball Association are wearing t-shirts to support a progressive Congressional candidate opposing a team owner who opposes racial equality.

Youth climate activists .. A teen-age activist from the US has launched an international nonprofit organization, Climate Cardinals with over 5,000 volunteers translating climate information into more than 100 languages and dialects. The average age of the volunteers is 16!

International Day of Peace .. Campaign Nonviolence has already listed over 3500 actions planned for the national week of actions the third week of September around the International Day of Peace – “to take to the streets against violence and injustice, and to carry on Dr. King’s vision of what we could become—a new culture of nonviolence”

Peace movement .. The United National AntiWar Coalition, which unites a broad specturm of American peace organizations, has issued a “Call to Action”:

* Demanding justice and accountability against racist killer cops!*

* For economic justice in response to the economic collapse.


* In defense of migrants rounded up and deported!

* In solidarity with LGBTQ+ and disabled people

* Against endless wars, sanctions and occupations

Peace on the ballot .. New Haveners will vote on a referendum, proposed by the city’s peace commission and unanimously endorsed by the city’s Board of Alders on the following question: “Shall Congress prepare for health and climate crises by transferring funds from the military budget to cities for human needs, jobs and an environmentally sustainable economy?”

Progressive political agenda .: Addressing the Democratic National Convention, Representative Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez called for a mass people’s movement working to establish

* 21st century social, economic, and human rights, including guaranteed health care, higher * education, living wages, and labor rights for all people in the United States;

* a movement striving to recognize and repair the wounds of racial injustice, colonization, misogyny, and homophobia, and to propose and build reimagined systems of immigration

* and foreign policy that turn away from the violence and xenophobia of our past;

* a movement that realizes the unsustainable brutality of an economy that rewards explosive inequalities of wealth for the few at the expense of long-term stability for the many.”

Hopefully, in future editions of the bulletin, we will be able to report that these progressive mobilizations in the United States are able to provide a “soft landing” for the crash of the American empire.

HUMAN RIGHTS




Plan for Campaign Nonviolence Action Week, September 19-27, 2020

FREE FLOW OF INFORMATION



USA: Democratic Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez’s remarks to the 2020 Democratic National Convention

SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT



First Person: Turning ‘apathetic people into climate activists’; a young person’s view

DEMOCRATIC PARTICIPATION



Colombia: Details of the Non-Violence Secretariat to be created by the Mayor’s Office of Medellín

          

EDUCATION FOR PEACE



For colleges in the United States: First Year Connect

WOMEN’S EQUALITY



International Alert Programme on Women, Peace and Security in Nigeria

TOLERANCE & SOLIDARITY


Palestine: 15 lessons from 15 years of BDS

DISARMAMENT & SECURITY



US: The United National AntiWar Coalition – Call to Action

What is the legacy of Nelson Mandela for us today?


This question applies to the following articles in CPNN:

UN Secretary-General: Tackling Inequality: A New Social Contract for a New Era

SADC and United Nations honor Nelson Mandela

South Africa: Sisulu – UN Security Council Tenure Will Be Dedicated to Mandela’s Legacy

Mandela’s vision for a better world

On Mandela Day, UN joins call to promote community service and inspire change

Mandela Day 2014: how will you be an ethical leader?

Song for International Day of Nelson Mandela

Do not turn off the light – a book review

Mandela is the new Africa

UN Secretary-General’s Statement on the Death of Nelson Mandela

Minister Nkoana-Mashabane pays tribute to former President Nelson Mandela

English bulletin March 1, 2020

. CITIES TAKE THE LEAD . .

Nuclear disarmament. New York City is becoming the most recent city to plan for divestment of their funds from the nuclear weapons industry. Public hearings in the city on January 28 heard from a wide range of speakers in favor of this action. Speakers included the global campaign, Move the Nuclear Weapons Money, Mayors for Peace, young peope from Peace Boat and a representrative from the International Campaign to Abolish Nuclear Weapons (ICAN), which won the Nobel Peace Prize in 2017. Participants at the hearing expressed their love of the city and strong unwillingness to see New York, or any other place on the Earth, to be exposed to the threat of irreversible destruction that nuclear weapons poses.

Hundreds of cities have joined the cities appeal of ICAN calling for the total abolition of nuclear weapons. The appeal states: “Our city/town is deeply concerned about the grave threat that nuclear weapons pose to communities throughout the world. We firmly believe that our residents have the right to live in a world free from this Threat. Any use of nuclear weapons, whether deliberate or accidental, would have catastrophic, far-reaching and long-lasting consequences for people and the environment. Therefore, we warmly welcome the adoption of the Treaty on the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons by the United Nations in 2017, and we call on our national government to join it.”

The Appeal is also supported by Mayors for Peace with its network of 7675 cities in 163 countries around the world. The most recent city to support the appeal, on January 27, was Oxford in the UK.

Sustainable development. UN Habitat recently sponsored the Tenth World Urban Forum to support the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) agreed by world leaders in 2015. At the meeting, which took place in Abu Dhabi from 8-13 February, the 13,000 participants  recognized that “an increasingly urbanized world is a ‘transformative force’ that can be harnessed and steered to boost sustainable development.” Among the organizations of cities taking part in the Forum was ICLEI (Local Governments for Sustainability), a network of cities in over 100 countries, with global experts in 22 offices.

At the World Urban Forum, the Global Parliament of Mayors presented a project called the Virtual Parliament, an online tool to connect with Mayors around the world, to debate and vote on political issues and to exchange experiences. For example, it has supported an action of the US congress of Mayors against gun violence.

Reducing international tensions. The organization of International Cities of Peace reports that the first City of Peace on the Korean peninsula was established February 5 near the Demilitarized Zone (DMZ) in Pocheon. A major celebration was held at City Hall where Mayor Park signed a Proclamation as a crowd of media, dignitaries, and over 100 citizens packed the hall. Pocheon has the potential to help make the dream of Reunification of South and North Korea come true in order to benefit citizens of both countries.

Urban violence. A new initiative, the Strong Cities Network (SCN), is working with a broad coalition to reduce urban violence. According to the SCN, “Today, 83% of deadly violence occurs outside of conflict zones, with the majority of this violence concentrated in cities.” Their report highlights successful initiatives in Glasgow (Scotland), Oakland (California), and cities in Ecuador.

Tackling urban violence is also the priority of the World Forum on Cities and Territories of Peace, which is a project of the United Cities and Local Governments. Previous forums were held in Madrid in 2017 and 2018. The next one will take place this coming October in Mexico City to construct “solutions that promote urban environments capable of eliminating expressions of violence.”

According to the Strong Cities Network,”Nation states have dominated the global political arena for centuries, but with more than half of the world’s population today residing in cities, it may be time to rethink who should be at the table when it comes to decisions on how we can reduce violence.” The same could be said with regard to nuclear disarmament, sustainable development and the reduction of international tensions.

          

DEMOCRATIC PARTICIPATION



Strong Cities Network: Reducing violence is not impossible, and cities are proving this

FREE FLOW OF INFORMATION



Peace promotion in the Sahel: The best award-winning radio productions

HUMAN RIGHTS




Amnesty International: New generation of young activists lead fight against worsening repression in Asia

DISARMAMENT & SECURITY



New York City hearings pave the way for nuclear weapons divestment

EDUCATION FOR PEACE



For Bob Marley’s 75th Birthday, Ziggy Marley Reflects On His Father’s Legacy

SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT



The Wet’suwet’en Fight Against New Pipeline Spreads Across Canada with Blockades & Occupations

TOLERANCE & SOLIDARITY


Switzerland: Lutheran World Federation marks World Interfaith Harmony Week

WOMEN’S EQUALITY



Devoted to discovery: seven women scientists who have shaped our world

How can parliamentarians promote a culture of peace?

Here is a good example of how parliamenarians promote a culture of peace, taken from the CPNN article “Inter-Parliamentary Union: 139 parliaments demand immediate action on climate change”.

For many years, the IPU has been calling for legislative action on climate change and risk reduction. Since 2009, it has organized parliamentary meetings at each Global Conference of the Parties to the United Nations Convention on Climate Change (COPs) to increase the parliamentary contribution to global negotiations. With the adoption of this emergency resolution, the IPU will mobilize its member parliaments at the COP24 taking place in Krakow, Poland, later this year.

The 139th IPU Assembly brought together over 1500 delegates including 56 Speakers of Parliament, 52 Deputy Speakers, and over 750 MPs. Women MPs accounted for 33% of the total number of MPs in attendance, one of the highest percentages at an IPU Assembly. Young MPs under 45 made up 19% of the parliamentarians, the first time that the IPU is tracking this statistic.

Here are the CPNN articles on this subject:

How can sports promote peace?


This discussion question applies to the following articles:

US: WNBA players wearing T-shirts opposing Dream owner

Honduras: Culture of peace promoted in 200 young people from “hot” areas

Rio Olympics: Why the opening ceremony’s spotlight on climate change matters

Iranian Women Won More than a Medal at the Olympics

WNBA’s Minnesota Lynx acknowledge shooting victims with t-shirts

The soccer team you won’t see at the World Cup (Uganda)

International Day of Sport for Development and Peace

Legião da Boa Vontade propaga Cultura de Paz no Campeonato Amazonense

Legião da Boa Vontade Promotes the Culture of Peace at the Amazonian Championships

A Sport for Peace World Database

Peace and Sport has Reached New Heights

Sports for Peace in São Paulo

Colombian Network Football for Peace and Development

Exchange between Colombia and Peru: Football for Peace

Running for Peace

Is a U.S. Department of Peace a realistic political goal?

Anne Creter, the author of the article listed below about the Toronto Conference, responds as follows:

“We need a whole new system of governance devoted to the culture of peace.

One logical way would be to enhance the existing global movement calling for governmental Departments and Infrastructure for Peace (I4P) worldwide.

“The current U.S. bill in Congress (H.R.1111) to establish a Department of Peacebuilding is a great example of your points. See https://www.congress.gov/115/bills/hr1111/BILLS-115hr1111ih.pdf and https://peacealliance.org/issues-advocacy/department-of-peace/ .

“The UN Development Programme has much evidence of governmental I4P effectiveness in certain countries where they are operational and have been shown to reduce violence. (Journal of Peacebuilding & Development Special I4P Issue, volume 7, Number 3, 2012 ISSN: 1542-3166).

“So let us develop a viable institutional framework for peace. Let us advocate our legislators for governmental Departments & I4P NOW.”

Here are the CPNN articles on this subject:

Participatory budgeting, How does it work?

Reading CPNN, we can see that we are advancing towards a culture of peace in little steps throughout the world. A good example is the progress in Participatory Budgeting (PB) which is, in effect, democratic participation. News about PB may be found in local media, but not on the front pages of the international commercial media which does not consider it to be important. A number of these local stories (see below) were covered by the CPNN bulletin a few years ago.

Here are CPNN articles about participatory budgeting:

Two examples of Participatory Budgeting in Brazil

Mexico City reinforces the dissemination of participatory budgeting

Progress in Participatory Budgeting

New York City: Participatory Budgeting: Catch the Fever!

Paraná, Argentina: vecinos votaron las propuestas para Presupuesto Participativo

Paraná, Argentina: residents will vote on proposals to implement through the Participatory Budgeting Process

The municipality of Alcoutim, Portugal, launches Participatory Budgeting

Alcoutim lança Orçamento Participativo Municipal [Portugal”>

Participatory Budget 2014: Sunday will be the vote [Trenque, Argentina”>

Presupuesto Participativo 2014: el domingo será la votación [Trenque, Argentina”>

No reason to fear the people: Participatory budgeting in Brazil

Sem medo de povo: Orçamento Participativo no Brasil

Computerized voting system for Participatory Budgeting in Ubatuba, Brazil

Sistema informatizado de votação  para Orçamento Participativo é destaque em Ubatuba, Brasil

Participatory Budgeting for Youth in Rosario, Argentina

Presupuesto Participativo Joven – Rosario, Argentina

3.500 personas participaron en etapa de diagnóstico del Programa Presupuesto Participativo [La Serena, Chile”>

3,500 people take part in the diagnosis stage of participatory budgeting in La Serena, Chile.

How should elections be organized in a true democracy?

A blog by the CPNN coordinator in September 2017, asks if we are seeing the end of democracy: “. . . Leaders [in Latin America] who might have shown some sympathy with a culture of peace are gone, Hugo Chavez in Venezuela, Lula in Brazil and Fidel in Cuba, and their countries are moving to the right. This trend is not limited to Latin America. We have Trump, Putin, Duterte, Erdogan, rise of right-wing, even fascist parties in Europe, loss of the leadership of Mandela and Mbeki in South Africa, fading hopes that were raised by the Arab spring, and lack of any movement in Asia towards a culture of peace. Some might say it is the end of democracy, although I see it more limited as the loss of bourgeois democracy. After all, national elections are now almost solely determined by big money, and big money corrupts. To find progress towards true democracy it is necessary to look at a more local level.”

It seems from our CPNN coverage (list in right column) that the leadership on this question is being taken in Africa Here is a contribution to this question from Africa published in Transcend by David Tiomajou, Dean of the Faculty of Social Sciences and International Relations  at Protestant University of Central Africa:

“In recent years, the call for political systems based on power-sharing and liberal democracy of executive power has been in full swing in countries where shortage of change and coalition of power has resulted in large scale poor governance and chronic citizens’ frustration. Cameroon, with a unique exoglossic and colonial heritage is one of such countries. Against the background of half a century French-English constitutional Bilingualism with a vibrant heterogynous linguistic landscape, it provides an ideal setting for political debate nationwide in general and in its dual cultural heritage in particular.

Prof. Celestin Tagou in his 2017 book entitled Democratic Rotation in Office: Political Transcendency and Transformation of Ethno-regional Identities within the 21st Century Nation State, in 167 pages covering 4 chapters explores the concept of power sharing as shaped by the anthropological and socio-cultural realities of the African continent.

Beginning with the theoretical concepts of the family, the clan, the tribe, the ethnicity, the people, the race and the state and the nation, (Chapter 1). Prof. Tagou provides a sharp critical analysis of  the “copy and paste” western approach to liberal democracy and its devastating shortcomings within the African context (Chapter 2) before elaborating the main purpose of his book which is “Democratic Rotation in Office” nicely captured in French as “Démocratie Rotative”(Chapter 3) with two significant case studies from Central and West Africa namely Cameroon and Ivory Coast.(Chapter 4).

In a nutshell, Prof. Tagou argues that power sharing and political participation require positive peace which is a necessary condition for sustainable development and this can only be effective through a model of democracy which is in fine tune with African history, its customs as well as its ancestral knowledge. He reckons that the importation, the implementation and even more so the “Copy and paste” of Westminster and Jacobin constitutional democracy in African young states have been “a political and societal mistakes”. Democracy per se could have universal principles and values, but there is not a model of democracy, that is universal. The is a French, a German, a British, an American…. model which is adapted to the various history and cultural background of each country.

Above all, Prof. Tagou brings to the democratic debate table bold, interesting and eye-opening proposals: Africa should proudly and positively mold its own model of democracy rooted in its socio-cultural and ethnic pluralistic context. He proposes a model based on Johan Galtung’s concepts of transcendence and transformation of conflicts: Rotative Democracy as mechanism for the election of the President of the Republic.

This book has inter alia two major strengths: first the originality of the argument within the African context marred with chronic heated political tensions around the executive power second, the timing and relevance of the publication with regard to Cameroon, currently in a deadlock political crisis known as “Anglophone Problem”. Prof. Tagou details his proposals with real, reliable and clear facts.

Never the less, although beautifully written in a fascinating and movingly style; Prof. Tagou’s “Democratic Rotation of Office” may leave its reader with a bitter taste in the mouth: how sound and fare can the relationship between the strategic group and the conflicting ones be? Is the rotating period among the 7+1 groups not too long for frustrating citizens to wait? And, as clearly stated by Prof. Alain Didier Olinga in the preface: To which group do the mixed-raced, half-breed and half-cast Cameroonians belong?

Whatever the case, Prof. Tagou has taken an insightful stand into the political debate on power sharing and liberal democracy in Africa with a major step in the contribution towards the search for solutions to office rotation and power coalition in Cameroon and readers and specialists of political sciences within the African continent and beyond will find this book of special interest.”

This question pertains to the following articles

Ghana Election Petition Judgment: ‘Let’s Maintain Our Peace’

For a peaceful presidential election in Guinea: NGO CRGN launches awareness campaign for the Guinean population

Côte d’Ivoire : The traditional chiefs of Gagnoa call for peaceful elections

Nigeria: Akeredolu, Jegede, Ajayi Sign Peace Accord

Côte d’Ivoire: traditional chiefs gather in Yamoussoukro

Burkina: The Movement for the Culture of Peace and Love of the Fatherland

Culture of Peace in Guinea: Journalists Equipped with a ‘Common Ground Approach’ for Managing Rumors During Election Periods

Côte d’Ivoire: For peaceful elections in 2020, three Ivorian artists will walk from Abidjan to Korhogo

Peru: Electoral peace promoted in 4 native languages

Ivory Coast: National Symposium of Religious Leaders, Kings and Traditional Chiefs for a Culture of Peace and Non-Violence

Guber poll: When Ijaw elders converged on Yenagoa [Nigeria]

Benin: The Youth Movement for the Preservation of Peace and Democracy raises awareness of Atacora youth on non-violence

Nigeria: National Council for Arts & Culture moves for peaceful elections

The 815th meeting of the African Union Peace and Security Council: Report of the Commission on Elections in Africa

Lesotho: Local Government and the culture of peace

Democracy Spring: Thousands Descend on US Capitol, Over 400 Arrested

Côte d’Ivoire: REPSFECO-CI promotes a peaceful electoral process

Côte d’Ivoire: Le REPSFECO-CI invite les acteurs à un processus électoral apaisé

Uganda: Government to Set Up Election Conflict Resolution Body

Nigeria: Why we facilitated Abuja peace accord —Ben Obi

Rethinking Post-Election Peacebuilding in Africa

Zimbabwe: Christian denominations launch peace initiative

Hong Kong’s Occupy Central pushes for ‘genuine democracy’

Provincial Youth Conference on Peace, Harmony and role of Youth at Karachi

Varsities vouch for peace ahead of general elections (Kenya)

Women’s World in Nationwide Sensitization [Sierra Leone]

Ghana Youth Coalition wants politicians to commit to peace in 2012

Towards an Inclusive Democracy in Bangladesh