Category Archives: d-information

English bulletin November 1, 2023

. SOLIDARITY WITH GAZA . .

“We’re watching a genocide unfold in real-time. In just three weeks, the Israeli military has killed over 8,000 Palestinians in Gaza, among them over 3,000 children,” Jewish Voice for Peace (JVP) said early Monday (October 30). “That’s more than the annual number of children killed  in conflicts across the globe since 2019.” According to the United Nations, as of October 26, at least 45% of housing units have been destroyed or damaged.

In response, there is an unprecedented mobilization of solidarity with Gaza by millions of people around the world. As the Palestinian activist Mazin Qumsiyeh informs us, this will go down as the best documented holocaust in history.

As of October 23, we published photos of mass demonstrations in 42 countries, and a week later, on October 29, we published photos from 44 countries. As to be expected, the largest, involving millions of people, took place in predominantly Muslim countries, such as Pakistan, Yemen, Indonesia, Bangladesh, Iran, Malaysia, Iraq, Jordan, Morocco, Egypt, Qatar and Lebanon. In Turkey, the enormous demonstration was supported and addressed by President Erdogan.

Of great importance was the size of demonstrations in countries that support Israel. In the United Kingdom, London saw the biggest pro-Palestine demonstrations in British history. In the United States there were enormous demonstrations in New York, Chicago and San Francisco, among other cities. The demonstration of Jewish Voice for Peace that filled Grand Central Station in New York was part of a movement that has been called “the largest mass mobilization of Jews in American history.” A thousand demonstrators massed at Harvard University, the most prestigious university of the United States.

On October 28, Stockholm saw one of the largest protests in modern history, as thousands came out to support the people of Gaza. Despite attempts to ban their demonstrations, Palestinian supporters took to the streets in large numbers in Paris and Vienna. Other mass demonstrations took place in India, Nepal, Chile, Canada, Netherlands, Spain, Italy, Denmark, Australia, Brazil, New Zealand, Finland, Ireland, Greece, Switzerland, Norway, Belgium, Germany, Venezuela and even Poland and South Korea.

Amnesty International has documented unlawful Israeli attacks, including indiscriminate attacks, which caused mass civilian casualties and must be investigated as war crimes.

Calls for a ceasefire came from organizations around the world: not only Amnesty International, but also the United Nations General Assembly, Secretary-General Antonio Guterres, and UN agencies including the World Food Programme, the World Health Organization, the UN Development Programme, the UN Population Fund, and UNICEF. Other organizations demanding a ceasefire include the World Organization of the Scout Movement, the World Council of Churches, Oxfam, Save the Children, the Gulf Cooperation Council and the Association of South East Asian Nations. Individuals include Pope Francis and the Archbishop of Canterbury. Heads of state include Chinese President Xi Jinping and from Brazil President Lula da Silva. The U.S. State Department has had to instruct American diplomats not to use the word “cease-fire” in press materials, following the resignation of one of their top diplomats to protest their support for Israel.

A public opinion poll in the United States shows that 66% of likely voters agree that “the U.S. should call for a cease-fire and deescalation of violence in Gaza” and “leverage its close diplomatic relationship with Israel to prevent further violence and civilian deaths.”

Traditional peace organizations called for non-violence by Hamas as well as Israel. As for the violence of Hamas, it has been likened to a “jail break”. According to the UN Special Rapporteur on the situation of human rights in the Palestinian Territory, Israel’s military occupation has morphed the entire occupied Palestinian territory into an open-air prison, where Palestinians are constantly confined, surveilled and disciplined.

Despite the terrible toll of death and destruction, Mazin Qumsiyeh says “I am optimistic because the Zionist onslaught (targeting hospitals, schools, universities, bakeries, residential buildings, mosques, churches, wiping out whole families) has ignited the global uprising that I and others have been calling for and predicting for a long time. . . Just need to intensify the pressure because every day the US/Israel are allowed to go on means hundreds more killed. The sooner this nightmare ends, the closer we are to peace and justice.”

DISARMAMENT & SECURITY



Calls for ceasefire in Gaza

TOLERANCE & SOLIDARITY



The sea rescue association SOS MEDITERRANEE wins the Right Livelihood Award 2023

SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT



Tourism at the International Day of Peace Has a Double Meaning

FREE FLOW OF INFORMATION



RSF launches global “Collateral Damage” campaign highlighting the danger of the Assange prosecution to media and the public’s right to know

  

WOMEN’S EQUALITY



Yemeni peace laureate to deliver keynote speech on the matter in Cape Town today
w Collaborations And Collective Action At Women’s Conclave

EDUCATION FOR PEACE



Towards an African renaissance through culture and history

HUMAN RIGHTS



More Demonstrations for Palestine

DEMOCRATIC PARTICIPATION



3rd World March for Peace and Nonviolence officially launched in the Spanish Congress of Deputies

English bulletin October 1, 2023

. INTERNATIONAL DAY OF PEACE .

According to our survey of the Internet there was an increase in participation in the International Day of Peace this year. This was true in all regions of the world except for Africa and the Arab and Middle Eastern States.

There were more actions in Russia and the Ukraine, especially in schools and universities, but they many were greatly complicated by the war. Most simply wished for peace, often expressed by cutting paper doves or origami and hanging them for all to view or giving them to people. But many other actions explicitly supported the soldiers on their side of the war. In the events in schools of the Ukraine, many called for victory. And some events in schools of Russia were carried out by army representatives recruiting for the war. Since criticism of their war effort is forbidden, it could not be directly expressed on Russian websites. However, in a few cases, it was indirectly expressed in the form of anti-war cartoons that we have reproduced.

As usual, the greatest number of actions took place in Europe. In France, thanks to the mobilization by Mouvement de la Paix and militant trade unions, there were actions in half of the one hundred departments of the country bearing the multi-colored flag of peace. In Belgium, most towns and cities took part in the action of raising the peace flag above the town hall. There were actions in 42 towns and cities of Italy this year. Especially touching was the Italian school that planted a cherry tree in memory of their favorite bear who recently died. The bear was named “Black Cherry” because she was especially fond of this fruit. And especially unusual was the football tournament in the Rebibbia women’s prison near Rome. The director of the prison said “We wanted to celebrate the International Day of Peace through sport, which has always been fertile ground for exalting the values of solidarity, fairness and respect for others.”

Also as usual, the next largest mobilization was in North America, involving 43 of the 50 United States and 4 Canadian provinces. Often, an entire city was mobilized, as was the case in Chicago, Boston, Philadelphia and Montreal. The United Nations devoted the day to a program involving youth from around the world and their contemporary culture. In his annual message, the UN Secretary General Antonio Guterres referred to the deadly fires, raging floods and soaring temperatures around the world and called for action to “end the war on our planet and its natural gifts.”

There was a great increase in actions this year in Asia and the Pacific. This was especially evident in Japan, where there were 28 actions, including 13 where high schools participated in a project to draw large-scale calligraphy for peace. In India and Nepal, we found 17 actions carried out by a variety of civil society organizations including Scouts and Guides, Lions Club and Rotary, as well as schools and universities.

The greatest increase in actions this year was in Latin America. This included 28 actions in Brazil, 15 in Mexico and 14 in Argentina, as well as action in 14 other countries. In 10 of these countries, actions were carried out at a government level. At the level of municipal authorities: Esquel, Mendoza and Puerto Genera San Martín in Argentina; Campo Grande, Guarulhos, Juazeiro and Ourinhos in Brazil; Medellin and Popayan in Colombia; Holguin in Cuba; Quito in Ecuador; and provincial authorities in La Altagracia, Dominican Republic and Merida and Queretero in Mexico. National government authorities were involved in Mexico, Panama, Paraguay and Venezuela.

There were fewer actions in Africa, 59 this year compared to 74 last year. In the states of central Africa torn by conflict and trying to separate from European neo-colonialism, the occasion was used to call for dialogue and non-violence. Actions in this regard took place in Burkina Faso, Cameroon, Central African Republic, Chad, Democratic Republic of Congo, Gabon, Mali, Niger, Nigeria, South Sudan and Togo. Angola took the occasion of the International Day of Peace to announce the third edition of the Pan-African Forum for the Culture of Peace that will take place later this year. Of special importance, given the vulnerability of Africa to the effects of global warming, was the initiative for planting of trees in Kenya.

There were fewer actions in Arab States and the Middle East this year, but the good news is the increased dominance of the voice of women. In Kuwait, The Women’s Institute for Development and Peace used the occasion of Peace Day to announce the formation of an Arab Women’s Network for Peace. And in Syria, the office of the Kurdistan Women’s Union hosted a dialogue session for the International Day of Peace calling for an end to violence and armament and for a comprehensive and just political solution that saisfies all parties in Syria.

In addition to the actions listed above, there were some virtual events on an international scale, including the following:
° Women as Powerful Agents of Transformation for Peace
° Peace One Day
° Peace Education Day
° Service Civil International: The many ways of peace and antimilitarism
° NoWar2023 Conference: Nonviolent Resistance to Militarism

Fortunately, the last two events specifically attacked the culture of war, unlike most events that took place this year for the International Day of Peace. This is important, as pointed out in our most recent blog.

GLOBAL



What has happened this year: International Day of Peace

UNITED STATES AND CANADA



United States and Canada: International Day of Peace

EUROPE



Europe: International Day of Peace

ASIA AND PACIFIC

Asia and Pacific: International Day of Peace

  

EX-SOVIET COUNTRIES

Ex-Soviet Countries: International Day of Peace

ARAB STATES AND MIDDLE EAST



Arab States And Middle East: International Day of Peace

LATIN AMERICA AND CARIBBEAN

Latin America and Caribbean: International Day of Peace

AFRICA

Africa: International Day of Peace

Does China promote a culture of peace?


A recent article in CPNN (June 7, 2023) quotes the Deputy Director-General of the Chinese Academy of History “The pursuit of peace and harmony is the foundation of the Chinese spirit. It is in the gene of Chinese civilization. In the 5,000-year history, our ideal world is of great unity. We value a culture of peace and unity.”

An example of recent peacemaking initiatives of China is their proposal for peace in Ukraine, based on a series of fundamental principles for peaceful international relations. Their proposal was welcomed by many countries that are not directly involved in the war, but some voices were more critical of the Chinese proposal. Writing from Indonesia, the news agency Inilah quotes the India-based EurAsian Times that the Chinese plan contradicts their own policy towards Taiwan, since the Chinese do not respect their sovereignty and have imposed sanctions against them.

China has never recognized the independence of Taiwan, and has threatened military intervention. As stated in a recent blog, “Among the peacemakers are the Chinese to some extent. We can only hope that this aspect of Chinese policy will dominate in the coming turbulent period of history. Will the Chinese be able to resist peacefully the provocations of the American Empire such as those connected with Taiwan? Faced with such provocations in the Ukraine, the Russians fell into the trap of war: we must hope that the Chinese will not do so in Taiwan.”

Here are CPNN articles related to the question whether China promotes a culture of peace:

11th World Peace Forum held in Beijing

China Culture: Xi calls for protection of Chinese civilization, culture and heritage

Chinese proposal of principles for a peace settlement of the Ukraine War and reactions around the world

English bulletin May 1, 2023

INTERNATIONAL YEAR OF DIALOGUE FOR PEACE

There has not been very much publicity, but the United Nations General Assembly has proclaimed this year as the International Year of Dialogue as a Guarantee of Peace.

The proposal came from Turkmenistan with 68 co-sponsors including all of the countries of Central Asia, reflecting the fact that these countries are menaced by the nearby war in the Ukraine. The resolution was adopted by consensus although reservations were expressed by the United States, United Kingdom and Ukraine.

In his opening remarks at the launch ceremony in January, Vepa Hajiyev, Deputy Minister of Foreign Affairs of Turkmenistan, said, “Currently, these principles and goals are particularly relevant against the background of the existing systemic problems of international relations. In this context, we see a common task in turning the International Year of Dialogue as a Guarantee of Peace into a powerful constructive process designed to provide an incentive for dialogue, cooperation, and mutual understanding”. Other speakers at the launch ceremony considered the year as implementation of the 1999 International Declaration and Programme of Action on a Culture of Peace.

Concerning the war in Ukraine, a new proposal from China insists that “Dialogue and negotiation are the only viable solution to the Ukraine crisis. All efforts conducive to the peaceful settlement of the crisis must be encouraged and supported. The international community should stay committed to the right approach of promoting talks for peace, help parties to the conflict open the door to a political settlement as soon as possible, and create conditions and platforms for the resumption of negotiation. China will continue to play a constructive role in this regard.” 

According to the analysis of the French Mouvement de la Paix, the Chinese proposal was supported by many commentators in the Global South, while it was dismissed by the United States and its European allies. Some Asian countries, however, remarked that China should live up to these principles with regard to Taiwan.

Dialogues for peace are ongoing through the auspices of the International Parliamentary Union, including between opposing sides of the conflicts in Ukraine, Palestine and Cyprus.

Another important voice for peace through dialogue is that of Pope Francis. In a video distributed worldwide on February 6, the Pope states that, “The time has come to live in a spirit of fraternity and build a culture of peace.” In recent years the Pope has stressed dialog for peace with other religions, such as in his meeting with the grand imam of Al-Azhar in Egypt in 2019 and his voyage this year to Africa with the Archbishop of Canterbury and the Moderator of the General Assembly of the Church of Scotland.

In Africa, a continent torn by many armed conflicts, there are important voices for peace through dialogue.

Speaking at a Global Security Forum, General Djibril Bassolé, former Minister of Foreign Affairs of Burkina Faso, caused a sensation by saying “We must dialogue with armed terrorist groups . . . In any case, dialogue is one of the typically African means of settling conflicts and easing tensions. I think that as Africans we must find our own ways to resolve the crises that have undermined our societies.”

With regard to African traditions for settling conflicts, a recent homage to the great poet of Madagascar, Jean Joseph Rabearivelo, underlines that “Through cultural diversity, which should be nurtured by a permanent dialogue without ulterior motives, we are rich in our differences!”

A broad approach of dialogue is being supported in Burkina Faso by the NGO Search for Common Ground. More than 500 participants, including local authorities, religious and customary leaders, and representatives of eight communities took part in an event in March. The strong participation of women, with 300 present, underscored their crucial role. The neighbouring country of Niger has made dialogue with violent extremist groups an important part of its strategy. By including dialogue in its counter-terrorism efforts, Niger is experimenting with an approach similar to those in Algeria  and Mauritania , which underpin their decade-long protection against jihadist violence.

In Latin America, where dialogue made possible the peace accords in Colombia, another step forward was taken this month when the dissident rebel group, Estado Mayor Central (EMC), finally agreed to begin peace talks with the government.   And in Mexico, also torn by violence, a national peace conference was convened in March by 175 organizations and groups. “We want to talk to each other, listen to each other, understand each other, support each other. We want to imagine and build all possible safeguards to face violence and find all the paths to peace.”

In Europe, where Greece and Turkey have long been in conflict, a new commitment to dialogue was made by the defense ministers of those countries following a joint visit to the areas of Turkey devastated by the earthquake in February.

In Asia, it seems that dialogue for peace can be dangerous. As explained by Al Jazeera, “under South Korean law, citizens are prohibited from contact with North Korean people or organisations unless they receive government permission.” Despite this, South Korea’s two biggest trade unions, the KCTU and the FKTU, signed a joint statement last fall with their sibling trade union in North Korea, opposing US war exercises. The South Korean government responded with a crackdown. In January the national intelligence service raided KCTU offices. Multiple organizers and union leaders were charged under the anti-communist National Security Law, accused of being spies for North Korea.

In a world where there is increasing danger of a nuclear war that could destroy all human civilization, the need for peace through dialogue is greater than ever. Let us hope that all world leaders will engage in this dialogue.

FREE FLOW OF INFORMATION



United Nations International Year of Dialogue as a Guarantee of Peace, 2023 

TOLERANCE & SOLIDARITY



Pope’s Video: “Let Us Develop A Culture Of Peace”

SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT



BRICS: A New Leader’s Big Banking Opportunity to Improve Global Development

DISARMAMENT & SECURITY



Mouvement de la Paix: Chinese Peace Plan

  

WOMEN’S EQUALITY



Women peace-makers call for a holistic and sustainable peace

EDUCATION FOR PEACE



Brazil: Lula creates working group to combat violence in schools

HUMAN RIGHTS



The State of the World’s Human Rights: Amnesty International’s Annual Report 2022/23

DEMOCRATIC PARTICIPATION



Search for Common Ground – Burkina Faso Promotes Community Resilience through Dialogue and Peace Initiatives in Ouahigouya

English bulletin March 1, 2023

WORLD DIVIDES OVER THE UKRAINE WAR

In our special bulletin of February 17, we published some of the important voices from North America and Europe who oppose the American/NATO escalation of the war in the Ukraine. Unlike most of the major media in those countries, these voices are not “obedient” to their governments’ policies.

At the end of the special bulletin, we quote Lula, the new President of Brazil, who said his country is willing to contribute, together with countries such as China, India and Indonesia, to create a “club of countries that want to build peace on the planet.” And we asked if the rest of the world stop the US, Europe and Russia from sleepwalking all of us to Armageddon?

In order to answer this question, we translated the phrase “Ukraine War opinion” into Arab, Spanish, Bangla, Hindi, Korean, Indonesian and Turkish, and searched via Google for articles published locally during the past month in those languages (but not the international services of BBC, VOA, etc.) For Africa, we searched in French and English. The quotations below have been translated into English from the various languages as you can see by using the translation service of a Chrome browser.

Beginning with Brazil and the other countries listed by Lula, what is the opinion of the major media outside of the NATO countries and their allies? Do they support or oppose the escalation of the war?

As for Brazil, the meeting of Lula with US President Biden is described as follows by Emir Sader in the Argentinian media Pagina12: “Lula reiterated that he does not want to send weapons to the war in Ukraine, because he is for peace, he wants to find a way to end the war and not prolong it. But Biden ignored Lula’s words. . . . (Lula’s) . . . words in the US still sound like those of a true statesman, next to the small size of the head of the world’s greatest war power.”

As for China, the Indian expert Antara Ghosal Singh from the Observer Research Foundation, writes that China’s strategy regarding the current crisis in Europe is to sit away and watch the war of two forces. . . . Chinese experts who talk about peace and agreement often say that they are waiting for the monkey to get an advantage in the fight of two cats. China will be the only big power to escape from this war without any damage.

As for India, an opinion piece by a professor at Mahindra University published by the Navbharat Times, the largest Hindi daily in terms of circulation, concludes that America and Europe are “caught in the web of war.” The sanctions imposed by West because of the Russia-Ukraine war are only benefiting India and China. The writer cites the following estimates by the International Monetary Fund for economic growth : the Russian economy could grow at 2.1% in 2024, compared to 1% for the US, 1.6% for the 27 countries in Europe, and 0.9% for Japan. The countries that do not ban oil imports from Russia, India and China are going to achieve a growth rate of 6.8% and 4.5% respectively.

In Indonesia, El Shinta news quotes the suggestion that neutral countries such as Argentina, Brazil, China, India, Indonesia and South Africa could act as intermediaries for a peace accord in the Ukraine because their attitudes are not anti-Russia, but also not anti-Ukrainian. But the article complains that it has become more and more difficult to mediate an end to the war, largely because of the neoconservative group in the United States who want a complete defeat of Russia and who, therefore, often intercept and kill peace initiatives, including those initiated by Israel and Turkey.

Elsewhere in Asia, in Bangladesh, Monayem Sarkar, Director General, Bangladesh Foundation for Development Research, writes in abnews24: “Ukraine has truly become a battleground for the US-led NATO alliance versus Russia. The Ukrainian army led by Vladimir Zelensky is actually waging a ‘proxy war’ on behalf of the NATO alliance. . . . This totalitarian war needs to be stopped as soon as possible. Whether it is to strengthen America’s hegemony or to boost its armaments industry, peacemakers around the world must come forward to end this war. If the Ukraine war is prolonged without immediate resolution, the possibility of a nuclear attack cannot be ruled out. At one point, many are expressing fear that the West will be directly involved in this battlefield, which will practically lead to the Third World War.”

And in Korea, the new book by Professor Lee Hae-young of Hanshin University, entitled “Ukrainian War and New World Order” is reviewed in Hani.com. The book claims that what is leading this war is the ‘neocon’ seeking ‘expansion of liberal hegemony’. Rather than a war between Ukraine and Russia, it is a ‘proxy war’ between the United States and the West, with Ukraine at the forefront, against Russia. The eastward march of NATO, which began in earnest in the 2000s and even reached Ukraine, is one of the proximate causes of the war. Another review of the book, published in pression.com, concludes “After the Russo-USA War, the world order will be shaken. These changes will further destabilize the Korean Peninsula. The present Ukraine may be the Korea of the near future. I sincerely recommend reading this book to many people who are concerned about the future of the Korean Peninsula.”

Although the Arab countries have long been allied with the United States, their attitudes towards escalation of the Ukraine War are not favorable. Here is a list:

Pan-arabist satellite news television channel Al Mayadeen, based in Beirut: “the reconstruction of Ukraine needs at least 20 years, meaning that the defeat of Ukraine has become a fait accompli that cannot be changed. As for the Western camp, especially the United States of America, its goal may be to weaken Russia as much as possible by engaging it in the war in Ukraine to deplete its strength, without this reaching the point of cornering it, because that would make Moscow resort without thinking to using its nuclear weapons, which is what the Russian leaders recently threatened. But the problem lies in whether the West did not take these threats seriously, then the whole world would have slipped into what is unimaginable.”

Lebanon: an article in the Beirut daily newspaper Al Akhbar. “Ukraine War: Subjugation of Europe and then Russia.” The Ukraine War is “an American war against Russia, with Ukrainian hands and European tools, while Europe itself is the implicit target for its subjugation.” “This war, its repercussions, and the rejection of this policy of American hegemony that we are witnessing, as if the world has had enough of imposing will at all levels, indicate that the world is heading towards a new multipolar system, and the decline of American hegemony in its unilateralism.”

Kuwait: an article in Alrai Media. “European countries cannot maintain their support for the war for a long time, and therefore the currency will lose its purchasing value and inflation will push to record levels, causing economic disasters and recession. Despite the economic damage to partners in Western Europe, President Joe Biden’s administration cannot stop the war at its peak because losing would be a disaster. If the war ends anytime soon without weakening Russia, Washington will lose control of Europe. In this case, Western European doubts regarding the continuity and viability of NATO will return. Therefore, it is expected that the ferocity of the battle – and with it the rise in commodity prices – will rise in the coming months to break or weaken Russia before the end of the US president’s term, if possible.”

Saudi Arabia: an article by Major General Samir Farag published by the MBC Media Group. “It is now required to quickly reach peace talks between the conflicting parties, otherwise, with the onset of spring, Russia will launch comprehensive offensive operations to seize more Ukrainian lands. It is expected that Russia’s first goal in the upcoming spring offensive will be to seize the port of Odessa on the Black Sea to prevent Ukraine from having ports on the seas, especially the Black Sea, after it lost control of the Sea of Azov. In these battles, Russia will use the scorched-earth method, using the new Russian types of missiles, King, Alexander, and Doomsday. Russia may also consider seizing Kiev, the capital, to overthrow the Ukrainian regime. All these assessments will lead the world to the necessity of resorting to peace, because peace is needed not only to Russia and Ukraine, but also to all countries of the world.”

Egypt: An opinion piece by Hicham Mourad of Cairo University published by the weekly Ahram. “Egypt’s position is similar to that of the majority of the Gulf monarchies and it has remained largely neutral since the start of the war. It has been quiet in its criticism of Russia and unwilling to join in the imposition of Western sanctions. Cairo’s burgeoning political, economic and military ties with Moscow explain its position. They include in particular a $25 billion contract for the construction of the Al-Dabaa nuclear power plant on the North Coast, the construction of a Russian industrial zone in the Suez Canal economic region, major reports trade and tourism, as well as arms contracts.”

United Arab Emirates: An editorial in Al Khaleej, the leading newspaper published in the country. “The declaration of the Atlantic countries to send weapons and ammunition of an offensive nature does not mean that the battle will be resolved easily. Rather, the opposite is true, because Kiev’s confessions confirm that its situation is critical. . . the fear remains because the defeat of any party will be a major problem and a horrific collapse of the European security system and the entire world, and there will be no room for remedy unless all parties are convinced of deliberation and avoid confronting that moment.

Jordan: An article published in Al Ghad, Jordan’s first independent Arabic daily national newspaper. “A recent op-ed in The Washington Post offers an insight into the mindset of US foreign policy makers. Former Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice and former Secretary of Defense Robert Gates. . . . call for “dramatically” more arms shipments to Ukraine. . . . Their solution is clearly unreasonable: let the people of Ukraine suffer more so that the country can defeat Russia and regain all Ukrainian lands. This is not, neither moral nor logical, a solution at all.”

In Sub-Saharan Africa, we found articles from Mali, Kenya, Nigeria, South Africa and the African Union published in French or English.

Mali: a long opinion piece by Rene Naba published in Maliactu. “The tragic truth is that if the West had not sought to expand NATO into Ukraine, it is unlikely that a war would have raged in Ukraine today. . . History will severely condemn the United States and its allies for their astonishingly stupid policy towards Ukraine”, argues John Mearsheimer, professor of Political Science at the University of Chicago. . . . Ukraine would be expendable for the United States. But Mearsheimer fails to see that the war is existential for the United States too: if Russia holds out, their imperial system crumbles.”

Kenya: a weekly column by Gitau Warigi for the Sunday Nation. “Something, whatever, should be done to end the ruinous Russia-Ukraine war. . . . The high fuel and food prices and general disorganisation across the world that it has brought has made everybody suffer. Ukraine President Volodomyr Zelenksy needs to take the lead in this initiative. He should open negotiations with Russia. His country’s cities are being destroyed by fusillades of missiles and drones fired from Russia. Infrastructure is being systematically destroyed.

Nigeria: an article by Tarkaa David in the online journal “leadership.” “Africa, Victim Of Ukraine-Russia Crisis”. “The huge financial assistance to Ukraine, primarily for the supply of weapons and military equipment by Western countries has significantly reduced the volume of aid to African countries. . . . NATO weapons will again arrive in Ukraine, most of which will flood the “black markets” and get to the countries of the African continent, where they are highly likely to be used in the commission of terrorist act.s . . . According to the report, apart from providing huge assistance to Kiev, Washington is deliberately provoking a food crisis in African countries by disrupting the supply of agricultural products from Ukraine.”

South Africa; an opinion piece in The Mail and Guardian. Most South Africans get their information about the war in Ukraine from Western media, and our own media, a good deal of which reports the Western line verbatim and uncritically. While the media often presents itself as impartial, this is never the case. . . . All powerful states deploy considerable resources and expertise towards shaping media narratives in their own interests. And during times of war, the media, including social media, is explicitly considered to be part of the battlespace. This is not a new development. As the old saying goes, “the first casualty when war comes is truth”.

African Union: The African News Agency reports that the Executive Secretary Ambassador, Zainab Ali Kotoko, of the Committee of Intelligence and Security Services in Africa (CISSA) has lambasted warring parties in Ukraine saying those who started the war are now trying to manipulate Africans to take their side. She refused to criticize the fact that South Africa is engaged in military training activities with Russia, saying that it must not be viewed as something wrong as long as it related to their bilateral relations and did not by any chance fuel the ongoing conflict.

In Latin America, in addition to the assessment of Lula’s encounter with Biden as described above, we found articles from Costa Rica and Argentina.

Costa Rica: opinion piece in El Mundo. “Ukraine: the war of the end of the world.” “Not to be apocalyptic, but the cards are on the table for a devastating global conflict.. . . Barack Obama decided to support a coup in kyiv (the Maidan), he created an absolutely unnecessary and unacceptably dangerous situation.  . . . And finally, his vice president (Biden) had the Russian invasion of Ukraine explode in his face. He hasn’t done a better job than his predecessor. Instead of forcing an immediate peace, he has pushed Ukraine into a war that is sustained solely by the barrage of weapons provided by the West. . . . Everything indicates that Russia, which began its invasion as a “special military operation”, is going to stop using rhetorical titles and launch its conventional power over poor Ukraine. . . . But the bigger problem is that if things don’t work out for Russia, it always has its nuclear arsenal. And there, we are going to be affected all over the planet. These political leaders are playing a game that can put the existence of humanity at risk.

Argentina: An editorial by Hernando Kleimans in Telam, the website of the official news agency of the Argentine Republic. “The absurd theory of Washington’s exclusivity over the rest of the countries, about its privilege in establishing a “rules-based order” that only it knows about, comes face to face with the absolute majority of humanity. Heart-breaking testimonies of hunger, misery, climatic disasters, plagues or infant mortality are worthless. The imposition of the great military-industrial complexes and the monopolistic centers of financial speculation, such as the new “merchants of the temple”, over the pusillanimous vassal governments, prioritizes their particular interests and is indifferent to the catastrophe, towards which it marches happily and without scruples.

Finally, we turn to Turkey, caught between Europe and the rest of the world. Selahaddin E. Çakirgil, columnist for the Star, a high-circulation Turkish newspaper. “Is the ‘Russia-Ukraine War’ heading towards a ‘nuclear catastrophe’?” The Chairman of the Russian Duma has written “If Washington and NATO countries provide Ukraine with weapons that it can use to attack Russian cities and try to seize our lands, we will retaliate with more powerful weapons.” “Given the technological superiority of Russian weapons, foreign politicians making such decisions need to understand that their aid could result in a global tragedy that will destroy their country. It is untenable for them to argue that “nuclear forces have not used weapons of mass destruction in local conflicts before. . . It is also obvious that the Western Front is actually dragging Ukraine into a ‘Proxy War’ in order to secure its own future against Russia. . . . In short, the Ukrainian War is increasingly heading towards a more complicated situation.”

Most of the countries named above (Bangladesh, Brazil, China, Egypt, India, Indonesia, Jordan, Kenya, Lebanon, Mali, Nigeria, Saudi Arabia, South Africa and United Arab Emirates) were among the 101 countries that did not vote with the US, Europe and Ukraine on one or more of the UN General Assembly resolutions last week that condemned Russia and refused to criticise arm shipments to the Ukraine.

Opinion polls conducted recently in China, India and Turkey by the European Council on Foreign Relations confirm that ordinary citizens share the perspectives described above.

Finally, here is a curious fact that exposes the failure of Western media. The most recent opinion polls in the United States show that a majority of Americans no longer support the American arms shipments to Ukraine. But this information is not reported in the European or North American media. Instead, we learn this from Navbharat Times of India, Kabar24 of Indonesia and Elaosboa  of Egypt.

It is very dangerous that the “obedient” mass media of Europe and the United States continue to support the escalation of the war. Are they leading us sleepwalking into Armageddon? We return to the article by Hernando Kleimans in Argentina. He entitles his article, “Son malditos porque viendo no quieren ver…” – ” “They are cursed by seeing what they do not want to see…”, a phrase that comes from Jesus, according to the Gospel of Saint Matthew. Kleimans argues that “more than two thousand years later, that phrase echoes with more force than ever in the great corridors of international politics. It is that the blindness of those who continue to ignite the demons of war that can lead our green planet to its total destruction, a deserted wasteland that will continue to rotate in infinite space as proof of our inconsistency as a species.”

FREE FLOW OF INFORMATION

United Nation General Assembly divides over Ukraine resolution and Belarus amendment

TOLERANCE & SOLIDARITY

Let’s “work together for peace”, Nuns, Clergy Appeal after South Sudan Peace Pilgrimage

SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT



Tourism as a force for Global Peace

DISARMAMENT & SECURITY



France: Mouvement de la Paix for peace in Ukraine 24-25 February

  

WOMEN’S EQUALITY



Vatican: Women raise their voices for peace

EDUCATION FOR PEACE



Education in Burkina: More than 94,000 to learn in the 2023 literacy campaign

HUMAN RIGHTS



Nobel Peace Prize 2023: PRIO Director’s Shortlist Announced

DEMOCRATIC PARTICIPATION



Mexico: Initiative for a Law on Peace in Durango

Latin America, has it taken the lead in the struggle for a culture of peace?

This discussion was originally launched back in 2013 during what has been called the first progressive wave”. Here is a link to the discussion as it existed at that time. The photo above comes from that time, as well as the articles listed below prior to 2015.

The re-election of Lula in Brazil in 2022 has raised hopes for a second progressive wave”.

Following the re-election of Lula as President of Brazil, we asked the CPNN representative in Brazil, Herbert Lima, if he thought that Brazil would now take a leadership role for the culture of peace. Here is his assessment:

The first and second terms of President Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva (Lula) in Brazil, from 2002 to 2010, were marked by a strong campaign to build a culture of peace in the country. Lula and his Workers’ Party (PT) defended the idea that building a more just and egalitarian society would be fundamental for building a culture of peace.

During his term, Lula implemented policies aimed at reducing poverty and social inequality, such as the Bolsa Família program and raising the minimum wage. These measures had a significant impact on improving the living conditions of millions of Brazilians, contributing to the construction of a fairer and more balanced society.

In addition, Lula also stood out on the international level, seeking to build relations of cooperation and dialogue with countries in Latin America and the world. This posture contributed to the reduction of international tensions and to the promotion of a culture of peace.

Since the end of Lula’s term in 2010, the culture of peace in Brazil has faced difficulty. The subsequent government of Bolsonaro did not prioritize policies aimed at reducing poverty and social inequality, which contributed to increased social tensions and increased violence. In addition, there was an increase in hate speech and intolerance, which threaten the construction of a fairer and more inclusive society.

There was also a change in the country’s international posture, with a distancing from relations of cooperation and dialogue with other countries in Latin America and the world, which may have contributed to the increase in international tensions.

However, it is important to highlight that building a culture of peace is a continuous and challenging process, which requires the action of different sectors of society, and does not depend only on the government. Civil society plays a fundamental role in building a culture of peace, through campaigns and actions aimed at promoting tolerance, solidarity and inclusion, and during this period it did its part, opposing the Bolsonaro government and its policies of dismantling of the institutions of the Lula government.

It is still difficult to accurately predict how the future of the culture of peace in Brazil will be in the coming years, as there is a clear division and political polarization in the current congress. However, it is possible to evaluate the proposals and speeches of the Workers’ Party (PT) and Lula to assess expectations about the culture of peace in the country. (See CPNN article of January 9.)

In general, it is expected that, if Lula has political capital in Congress, he and the PT will again prioritize policies aimed at reducing poverty and social inequality, such as the Bolsa Família program and raising the minimum wage. These measures have the potential to improve the living conditions of the most vulnerable Brazilians and, thus, contribute to building a fairer and more balanced society, fundamental to a culture of peace.

In addition, Lula and the PT are expected to seek to strengthen cooperation and dialogue relations with other countries in Latin America and the world, which may contribute to the reduction of international tensions and to the promotion of a culture of peace. (See CPNN article of January 7.)

However, it is important to remember that building a culture of peace is a complex and challenging process, and that government action is just one of the many pieces of this puzzle. Civil society also plays a fundamental role in this process, through campaigns and actions aimed at promoting tolerance, solidarity and inclusion.

ARTICLES BEGINNING IN 2022

Revista CoPaLa, Constructing Peace in Latin America, July-December 2023

Book: Culture of Human Rights for a future of Peace

Mercosur without Racism: Brazil will propose a campaign at a meeting of ministers from the bloc

Brazil President Lula’s speech to the G7

Lula Won’t Send Arms to Ukraine: “Brazil Is a Country of Peace

Brazil’s ex-president Lula pledges to bolster Latin American integration if elected

Lula: “We will rebuild relations with all the countries of the world.”

The Latin American front, after the assumption of Lula

In COP27 Speech, Lula Vows to Make Amazon Destruction ‘A Thing of the Past’

ARTICLES BEFORE 2015

Congreso de Cultura de Paz esgrime detalles de justicia y equidad (Bolivia)

Culture of Peace Congress calls for justice and equality (Bolivia)

Bachelet y Humala proyectan futuro de paz (Chile y Perú)

Chile, Peru Plan a Future of Peace

Proclamation of Latin America and Caribbean as a zone of peace, signed by the Heads of State and Governments of the Community of Latin American and Caribbeans States

Is the media an arm of the culture of war?

It has been argued that over the past century the control of information, especially through the mass media, has become the most important characteristic of the culture of war. Why?

It is because there has been such an advance over the past century in democratic participation that the modern state is forced to justify its culture of war. Since people in general do not want war, the state and its military-industrial complex must convince them that military preparations are necessary in the face of external enemies. This is a major change from earlier history when the state was not subject to election by the people and it could pursue its policies regardless of their attitudes.

In fact, we see that the mass media in countries with the most powerful military forces, such as the United States, are pro-military and continually publish propaganda against external enemies and give priority to news about unavoidable violence and disaster. They do not give place to peace initiatives.

The state retains a monopoly on certain actions of the culture of war, such as the right to kill.

However, the manipulation of the media through dis-information is accessible to non-state actors as well who are opposed to progressive change, in particular the wealthy ruling class as well as other right-wing forces. Although they are not necessarily allied with national governments, they act under the moral umbrella of state manipulation of the media.

Hence, for example, it was primarily the wealthy class in Chile and their international capitalist allies that was apparently behind the dis-information campaign that defeated the referendum for a new and progressive constitution in Chile.

Here are the CPNN articles on this subject:

English bulletin June 1, 2022

. A GLOBAL YOUTH MOVEMENT? . .

Are we seeing the dawn of a global youth movement for peace and sustainable development?

If Australia is an example, the answer may be positive.

In Australia, the political landscape was changed radically in recent elections that saw young people turn out to vote in record numbers to address the issues they care about most: climate change, housing affordability and the rising cost of living. The electoral “greenslide” was made mostly of wins for seats that have the highest population of young people. 

In other countries around the world, it is the new generation that has taken the lead for social change.

In Chile, the young president Gabriel Boric won at the polls in December with historic popular support that surpasses even what the candidate’s own supporters could have imagined. In this sense, an important variable for the victory was undoubtedly the participation of young people. The youthfulness of Gabriel and the team that accompanied him in his campaign was a great asset in the face of a society tired of the same old faces, where young people had been neglected. His movement represents not only a political change, but also a generational change; there is no doubt that it accompanies a process that has been fundamentally raised in recent times by young people.

In Brazil, an army of volunteers, in just a few short weeks, have registered hundreds of thousands of first-time voters. Their nationwide drive is taking aim at youth voter apathy – and may help to boost a slipping advantage for left-wing former President Luiz Inacio Lula da Silva as he seeks to unseat far-right President Jair Bolsonaro in October’s election. “Nobody likes Bolsonaro,” said Evelyn Santana, 17, shortly after registering to vote. “Among my friends, most people are going to vote for (Lula). They want Bolsonaro gone.” Polls show the trend holds up nationally. More than half of young people aged 15-24 prefer Lula, according to a survey by pollster Datafolha, while less than 25% of that age group back Bolsonaro.

In Colombia, Gustavo Petro’s candidature for president goes into the run-off election with the support, above all, of Colombian youth, who demand changes and an improvement in living conditions. In fact, that request was shouted for months last year in the streets of Colombia, during an unprecedented National Strike. Young people are a key demographic for Gustavo Petro, who has close to 50% support among voters in that age group. The run-off election will take place on June 19.

In France, young voters are the key to the possibilities of the Left political parties, united in a coalition named NUPES (Nouvelle Union Populaire Ecologique et Sociale) to gain power the National Assembly in elections scheduled for June 12 and 19. In this context, considerable publicity was given to a speech delivered at the prestigious AgroParisTech graduation ceremony on May 10, in which eight students said they refused to perform “destructive jobs” and called on their comrades to join the ecological struggles and to work with their hands.

In the United States, it is students who have taken the lead in responding to continued school massacres by demanding that military weapons should be banned from sale. Although President Biden has said that something should be done, the US Congress continues to be dominanted by the gun lobby. “Legislators need to keep in mind that if we can’t vote now, they need to listen because we will be able to vote eventually,” said Maddie Ahmadi, a 17-year-old advisory board member for Students Demand Action. “And if they are not hearing us and they are not passing common sense gun legislation, we are going to vote them out of office.”

And in Russia, where President Putin and the Duma legislature are pushing the war in the Ukraine and suppressing any expression of opposition, young people are the only part of the population who are against the war. In the poll taken at the beginning of March, only 29% of youth aged 18-24 supported the war, while it was supported by 60% of the general population. Time will tell if their opposition can help end the war.

Despite all of the bad news (war in Ukraine, climate change, global famine, information wars, massive migrations) and dire predictions (crash of dollar, fall of Putin, civil war in the United States, danger of World War III), can we still dream of the promised land of peace? We can only hope that the new generation will provide the leadership required to survive this perilous period of history and guide us towards a culture of peace.

DISARMAMENT & SECURITY

disarm-us

‘We Refuse to Go On Like This’: US Students Walk Out to Demand Gun Control

TOLERANCE & SOLIDARITY

tol

Palestine: Tears and hope from the last few days

WOMEN’S EQUALITY

women

Women of the World Call for Peace

FREE FLOW OF INFORMATION

info

World Social Forum 2022 Declaration: Building together a common agenda for another urgent and necessary world

SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT

dev

France: “Desertons”: young engineers call for refusing “destructive jobs”

DEMOCRATIC PARTICIPATION

dem-rev

The Boric effect on Chilean youth

HUMAN RIGHTS

hr

‘It’s a Fight They’ll Get’: Defenders of Abortion Rights March throughout the United States

EDUCATION FOR PEACE

ed

Ecuador: Hip-hop and urban art are reaffirmed as a ‘culture of peace’ at a festival in Garza Roja

English bulletin April 1, 2022

. THE RUSSIAN PEACE MOVEMENT . .

As we stated in last month’s bulletin the mass media is jammed with articles about the war in Ukraine, whether Russian atrocities or Western arms being sent to expand the war.

We see our role in CPNN to provide the other side of the news, the mobilization of the peace movement.

Last month we published information from the peace movement on all sides of the conflict. This month there has been an enormous mobilization of the peace movement in Russia opposing their government’s aggression, despite censorship and despite the risks of loss of jobs, destruction of independent media and imprisonment of those who protest. This has been expressed in social media, since mainstream media is government-controlled.

A relatively complete list of Russian petitions, appeals and open letters against the war in social media is published on Google docs and we have reprinted it in CPNN along with frequent updates to overcome the censureship being imposed by the Russian government.

Those aspects of Russian culture that are world-renowned are strongly represented, including science and mathematics, information technology, chess and the arts.

Thousands of Russian scientists have signed an open letter condemning the war and saying that it “means that we, scientists, will no longer be able to do our job normally: after all, conducting scientific research is unthinkable without full cooperation with colleagues from other countries.”

Hundreds of Russian mathematicians have signed a similar open letter, saying that “our many years of efforts to strengthen the reputation of Russia as a leading mathematical center have been completely depreciated as a result of the unprovoked military aggression initiated by our country.”

Tens of thousands of Russian IT workers have signed an open letter, saying that “Progress and development of technologies for the benefit of man are impossible in conditions of war and threats to people’s lives and health, they are possible only in conditions of cooperation, diversity of points of view, information exchange and open dialogue.”

Leading Russian chess players have signed an appeal, saying, “The Ukrainian chess team is the reigning European champion, one of the best teams in the world along with ours. We played dozens of matches and hundreds of games. We have always put the game above politics – and the Ukrainians have responded to us in return. We ask you to give teams, players and ordinary people from both countries a chance for mutual respect. We are for peace. Stop the war!”

Tens of thousands of cultural figures signed an open letter against the war, saying, “the further escalation of the war will have irreparable consequences for artists and cultural workers. This will take away our last opportunities to fully work, speak out, create projects, popularize and develop culture, take away the future. Everything that has been done culturally over the past 30 years has now been jeopardized: all international ties will be broken, cultural private or public institutions will be preserved, partnerships with other countries will be suspended.”

Other aspects of deep Russian culture are also represented, including the Russian Orthodox Church and schoolteachers and the mothers of Russian soldiers.

Many priests and deacons of the Russian Orthodox Church signed an appeal to end the war, warning that “The Last Judgment awaits every person. No earthly authority, no doctors, no guards will protect you from this trial,” and “No nonviolent call for peace and an end to war should be forcibly suppressed and regarded as a violation of the law, for this is the divine commandment: ‘Blessed are the peacemakers.’”

Thousands of teachers from all regions of Russia signed a petition against the war but the names were withdrawn after they were threatened. However, some of the teachers who signed it describe the difficulty they face in responding to students’ questions about what is happening.

The Committee of Soldiers’ Mothers began during the Soviet war in Afghanistan as a network of locally based initiatives led by the families – principally the mothers – of soldiers to lobby the Kremlin for their safe return. They have become the main contact for tearful family members across Russia frantically tried to figure out the fate of their sons, brothers and husbands fighting in the Ukraine. And if there is one thing that can effectively counter the Kremlin’s narrative about its use of force in Ukraine, it is personal knowledge  from trusted sources of information – such as the testimony of combatants delivered to their parents. And these parents will share this knowledge with their extended family, with neighbours, with co-workers, and with friends.

A public opinion poll in Russia found 72% support for the Ukraine war in Russians over the age of 50. Their opinion is strongly influenced by state-controlled television. And this coincides with the fact that opinions about the United States and its allies, which were positive 25 years ago, have turned negative in recent years with the increasing menace cf the incorporation of Eastern Europe into NATO.

On the other hand, only 29% of Russians 18-24 years old support the war. They are more influenced by social media than by television. Hopefully, they will join with the Russian cultural figures mentioned above into a peace movement that can help bring an end to the war.

FREE FLOW OF INFORMATION

info

Russian anti-war movement takes shape on the streets – and on screens

TOLERANCE & SOLIDARITY

tolerance

Medellín and Barcelona advance in the project “Without Rumors We Build a Culture of Peace”

WOMEN’S EQUALITY

women

UN Women: International Women’s Day celebrates the contribution of women and girls as climate solution multipliers

DISARMAMENT & SECURITY

disarm

Germany: Bodensee Peace Region: No rearmament! Practice nonviolence

SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT

development

Historic day in the campaign to beat plastic pollution: Nations commit to develop a legally binding agreement

DEMOCRATIC PARTICIPATION

demo

Brazil : Juiz de Fora City Hall launches culture of peace project in schools

HUMAN RIGHTS

Human-rights

Colombia: Decriminalization of abortion is a triumph for human rights

EDUCATION FOR PEACE

education

Puerto Rico : Educate for a Culture of Peace

Can the peace movement help stop the war in the Ukraine?

There is a very extensive movement to stop the war in the Ukraine, but as of two months into the war, in April, 2022, it is not clear if the war can be stopped.

One recalls the movements against the US war in Vietnam and later against the US war in Iraq. The movements were very strong, but the wars continued for many years with millions of casualties.

Will it be different this time?

If it is possible to reach an armistice in the war, the peace movements will have played an important role.

Unfortunately, it seems that the goal of the American empire is not to achieve an armistice, but to continue to arm Ukraine with the goal of a complete military defeat of Russia.

Perhaps the war will drag on for many years until Ukraine is reduced to a state of devastation similar to that of Vietnam, Iraq, Syria and Afghanistan, victims of other recent wars.

Or perhaps it will escalate into World War III . . .

For an analysis written in June 2023 with conclusions similar to the above, but with extensive detail and documentation, see the following by Professor John J. Mearsheimer: The Darkness Ahead: Where The Ukraine War Is Headed

Note added July 2023. In little over a year, we have published almost 60 articles on this subject, and the ranks of peacemakers continue to swell and reach a higher level, as indicated by our latest CPNN bulletin.

_____________

Below are articles in CPNN about this question:

Ukrainian Pacifists Decide to Participate in Implementation of the Ukrainian Peace Formula

Exclusive: Putin’s suggestion of Ukraine ceasefire rejected by United States, sources say

American Attitudes about the Conflict in Ukraine

Russian Attitudes about the Conflict with Ukraine

Wives of Russian soldiers descend on Putin campaign office to demand demobilisation

Week of Global Mobilization for Peace in Ukraine

Demonstration for Peace in Ukraine Held in Budapest

The International Peace Bureau (IPB) Has Announced its Intention to Nominate Three Remarkable Organizations with a Focus on the Right to Conscientious Objection for the 2024 Nobel Peace Prize

Russia-Africa Summit Held Amid Worsening Global Security Situation

Ukraine: Saudi Arabia, UN, 40 Other Countries Hold Peace Talk In Jeddah

Russian War Opponents: The Diaspora

Lula meets the Pope, talks world peace

Putin tells Africans: Russia doesn’t reject negotiations with Ukraine

International civil society from Vienna: “We need negotiations that can strengthen the logic of Peace instead of the illogic of war.”

Austrian Censorship of Peace Conference Is An Outrage

Can Pope Francis bring peace to Ukraine?

Uk: A Win for Peace: UCU Opposes the War in Ukraine

Peace by Peaceful Means: International Summit for Peace in Ukraine

Mouvement de la Paix: Chinese Peace Plan

Chinese proposal of principles for a peace settlement of the Ukraine War and reactions around the world

Big Peace Rally in Germany: Despair and Joy

Yurii Sheliazhenko: Peace in Ukraine: Humanity Is at Stake

National March on Washington March 18 : Peace in Ukraine

Vatican: Women raise their voices for peace

France: Mouvement de la Paix for peace in Ukraine 24-25 February

UK National Demonstration: Peace Talks Now – Stop the War in Ukraine

What Do Ukrainians Want? Not an Uncompromising Battle That Puts Them in Grave Danger

Make peace, not war The Kremlin’s internal polling shows that more than half of Russians now favor negotiations with Ukraine

USA: Statement from Faith Organizations and Leaders Calling for a Christmas Truce in Ukraine

Ukraine: Message from Yurii Sheliazhenko to Mouvement de la Paix November 19

Russian mothers oppose the war

Say NO to U.S. wars! Actions took place in more than 70 areas across the US and Canada

Marching for peace in Ukraine: thousands in Rome ask for the peaceful resolution of the war

Statement of Moscow Helsinki Group

Peace Agenda for Ukraine and the World

Several Hundred Detained as Russians Protest Mobilization

Russia: Pop Diva Alla Pugacheva Comes Out Against the War

Proposal for a nuclear weapon trade-off to end the Russia/Ukraine war

Moscow TV protester plays ‘Russian roulette’ with risky comeback

Position of World’s Governments on Ukraine Considered Insane Pacifism in U.S.

The Second Level Geopolitical War in Ukraine Takes Over

A Nordic Initiative for Peace in Ukraine and Lasting World Peace

Facing severe repression, Russians are turning to antiwar graffiti

Appeal of the Clergy of the Russian Orthodox Church Calling for Reconciliation and an End to the War

More examples available of Russian opposition to the war against Ukraine

March 17: The struggle for free flow of information about the Russian war against Ukraine

Can Putin control Russian information?

Abolition 2000 Member organizations oppose Russian invasion of Ukraine

China: Academic dissent emerges on war in Ukraine but is censored

Russians are against the war on Ukraine

Ukraine: UNESCO statement following the adoption of the UN General Assembly resolution

Germany: Bodensee Peace Region: No rearmament! Practice nonviolence

How the U.S. Started a Cold War with Russia and Left Ukraine to Fight It

Russian anti-war movement takes shape on the streets – and on screens

Thousands of IT workers in Russia sign public anti-war petition

Russian teachers against the war

Lukoil, Russia’s largest private company, comes out against the war

Ukraine war: families of unhappy Russian conscripts could undermine Kremlin’s war effort

Open letter of Russian mathematicians against the war in Ukraine

Peace appeal from leading chess players of Russia to the President of the Russian Federation

Thousands of Russian cultural figures sign open letter against the war

An open letter from Russian scientists and science journalists against the war with Ukraine

USA: A Labor Statement on the Crisis in Ukraine

German petition against war in the Ukraine

Statement of Ukrainian Pacifist Movement

Statement of Peace Supporters against the Party of War in the Russian leadership

International Peace Bureau : Common Security Approaches to Resolve the Ukraine and European Crises

USA: United National AntiWar Coalition : US and NATO aggression towards Russia – danger at the Ukrainian Border

UK: Stop the War statement on the crisis over Ukraine

France : War is never the solution. Yes to a negotiated political solution.