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2nd Global Day of Action on Military Spending, 2012

an article by International Peace Bureau (excerpts)

On April 17, 2012, people all over the world will join together for the second Global Day of Action on Military Spending (GDAMS). We urge you to join us.



click on photo to enlarge

The current economic crisis has put pressure on the world’s governments to reduce spending on critical human needs: confronting climate change, battling deadly diseases, achieving the Millennium Development Goals. But apart from a few courageous exceptions, national governments continue to waste enormous resources on the military. Figures from the 2011 Stockholm International Peace Research Institute (SIPRI) annual report show that the world’s governments are spending more than ever on the military: $1,630 billion per year – and rising. If spent differently, this money would go a long way to resolving the real challenges facing our planet. . . .

On April 17, SIPRI will announce the military spending figures for 2011. Our GDAMS actions in capital cities and other locations around the world will offer the mass media photo opportunities and local stories about military spending. Local organizers can schedule their action on or near the Global Day.

This is the second Global Day. Last year’s event, held on April 12, 2011, was a big success, with nearly 100 actions in 37 countries. In 2012, activists will organize many types of events, from protests at military bases to teach-ins. Each location will devise its own approach. But all the events will highlight the latest figure for global military spending, which will likely approach $1.7 trillion . . .

Reporting is important – both to get the collective message out very widely, and to inspire each other to do new and bolder actions. In addition to written accounts of the work, we urge people to take photos and videos of their actions and send the best ones for posting at the GDAMS website.

Please get in touch (send to both addresses) with your ideas and action plans.
Contacts:
Colin Archer, International Peace Bureau
secgen@ipb.org
http://www.ipb.org
John Feffer, Institute for Policy Studies
johnfeffer@gmail.com
http://www.ips-dc.org/

DISCUSSION

Question(s) related to this article:


The overwhelming fiscal advantages of peace, how can this be communicated by peace activists?

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Latest reader comment:

Well I thought I would list some ideas on the fiscal advantages of peace...


The first thing that comes to my mind is the question of how many people try to cheat the system?  How many resources are spent trying to keep peopl honest or "in line?  Once 'Honesty' is practiced, taught, and valued who would cheat the system?  No one would!  Spending on keeping people "in line" or safe from those who disrespect life would not be needed (as least not to the same degree).

Another is that theft would go down or stop, thus making what we own safer.

dave


This report was posted on February 10, 2012.

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