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GLOBAL MOVEMENT FOR A CULTURE OF PEACE

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The Road to Athens
an article by Julie Matic

The Road to Athens (www.road2athens.com) is a multinational event that subscribes to the philosophy of "Peace, Love and Friendship" for today's world and tomorrow's people.

The message will be delivered to the 2004 Olympic Games which, in just a few short months, are set to unite the world and showcase its culture and flavors, as well as toast the best athletes, if only for two weeks.

The race will embark with 21 young Arab athletes, representing 7 different countries united to compete as goodwill ambassadors to the world. They will traverse over a 3400 kilometer span through six countries and 57 cities, all competing to reach Athens, Greece to deliver a universal message of "Peace, Love and Friendship" during the opening ceremony of The Olympic Games.

Kicking-off in Tabuk, in Northern Saudi Arabia on June 26th , the race follows a route through Jordan, Syria, Lebanon, Turkey and Greece. The athletes will push their endurance on a physical, mental and spiritual level by foot, camel, horse, and bicycle, while experiencing cultures and landscapes different from their own. Their agility and heart will shine through as they race towards the threshold of Athens on August 12th, where the winning team will have the opportunity to promote the "Peace, Love and Friendship" philosophy on the world stage of the Olympics . By virtue of the Road To Athens' philosophy, these young Arab men will act as goodwill ambassadors and show the world that their dreams and aspirations are really no different than those of young men from the streets of New York or Athens or the villages of Italy and Indonesia.

The Road to Athens invites the media, including CPNN to raise the level of awareness of Road to Athens and most especially, their universal message of peace, love and friendship. It would be a great partnership as we will set forth to make the world a more peaceful and friendly place.

For further information please see the website at www.road2athens.com or contact me at jmatic@keatingco.com or 973.400.5413.

DISCUSSION

Question(s) related to this article:


Can the Olympic Games promote a Culture of Peace?,

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LATEST READER COMMENT:

Concerning the potential of the Olympics to promote a culture of peace, we have received at CPNN the following observation about the 2012 Olympics from Palestinian activist Mazin Qumsiyeh.

I was proud to watch the great reception of the South African team which achieved several medals at the Olympics.  They were of mixed background: white and black, and various religions.  The all Zionist, all Jewish Israeli team were losers (and I am not speaking here of medals but of principles) who returned here without fanfare to an apartheid state reminds us that this cannot last.  But I dreamt of living to go welcome at the Lod Airport a winning Palestine Olympics team that includes Jews, Christians, and Muslims.  I know that this future of one democratic state is coming.  The example of South Africa is worth looking into.  Much struggle remains to be done in South Africa to achieve equality especially in economic issues. But we are long past the days when leaders of Apartheid South Africa met and collaborated in developing nuclear weapons and modes of repression with Jewish state leaders.
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This report was posted on June 10, 2004.