Tag Archives: Latin America

Mexico: Tlalnepantla Continues Work to Eradicate Gender Violence

. . WOMEN’S EQUALITY . .

An article from Ordenador

To raise awareness among citizens about the importance of eradicating gender violence and promoting a culture of peace throughout the municipal territory, the Tlalnepantla government continues to carry out activities of comprehensive attention to women, including a variety of services.

Each month the Municipal Institute for Women’s Equality and Development (IMIDM) carries out an average of 12 days of activities in various communities to prevent more women from being victims of some type of violence.


At their stands, attendees are given information on this topic, and it is expected that they in turn replicate this knowledge among their families and neighbors, to detect situations of violence in their communities.

During conferences, psychologists specialized in this subject offer a talk in which they teach the definition of violence and how to detect it; what is the gender violence alert, and what is the cycle of violence. Attendees are provided with emergency numbers to be called in case of violence.

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(Click here for the original in Spanish.)

Question for this article

Protecting women and girls against violence, Is progress being made?

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After the presentation, attendees have the opportunity to participate in a “Workshop to promote self-employment”, which is carried out free of charge, with the purpose of empowering women to generate their own economic resources to access a better quality of life.

Among the activities carried out in this workshop, crafts are taught for the preparation of candy, bags, baskets, portraits and key rings, as well as the manufacture of products for cleaning the home, which can then be marketed to obtain additional income

Those interested in participating in this workshop should contact the IMIDM, gather a group of at least 25 people and have an adequate space for the preparation of food.

It is worth mentioning that these days are carried out in coordination with the Municipal Health Institute and with the Municipal DIF System, which is why services such as eye examinations, pressure collection and vital signs, dental check, among others, are also available.

For his part, Edgar Mauricio Zepeda Montes, a resident of Santa Monica, acknowledged that this type of conference serves to raise awareness among people about gender violence and the way in which it harms the development of society.

Monica Bribiesca Barrera, from Valle Ceylán, said that these activities contribute to improve the environment in their communities “because there should be no violence of any kind, at any age, not even towards animals. Violence denigrates all of us as living beings.”

Brazil: Experts Support Teacher Training for Culture of Peace

… EDUCATION FOR PEACE …

An article from Agência Câmara Notícias (translation by CPNN)

In a public hearing on Wednesday, the 14th. experts called for public policies to train teachers to promote a culture of peace in schools, The debate was promoted by the special commission to draft legislative proposals to develop a culture of peace.


Committee chairwoman Keiko Ota (center) has called for tougher laws to curb violence, but acknowledges that it is necessary to think about prevention policies to teach children and young people how to cultivate peace in schools

The United Nations defines a culture of peace as a set of values, attitudes, traditions, behaviors and lifestyles based on respect for life, the end of violence and the promotion and practice of non-violence through education, dialogue and cooperation.

According to Nei Salles Filho, the coordinator of the Center for Studies and Training of Teachers in Education for Peace and Coexistence of the State University of Ponta Grossa (Paraná), the main step for the promotion of a culture of peace is teacher training. “This training involves knowledge of the areas of human values, human rights and mediation of conflicts,” he said. According to him, designing public policies in this sense is the best way to maintain continued projects of culture of peace in schools.

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Questions for this article:

Where is peace education taking place?

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The United Nations defines a culture of peace as a set of values, attitudes, traditions, behaviors and lifestyles based on respect for life, the end of violence and the promotion and practice of non-violence through education, dialogue and cooperation.

According to Nei Salles Filho, the coordinator of the Center for Studies and Training of Teachers in Education for Peace and Coexistence of the State University of Ponta Grossa (Paraná), the main step for the promotion of a culture of peace is teacher training. “This training involves knowledge of the areas of human values, human rights and mediation of conflicts,” he said. According to him, designing public policies in this sense is the best way to maintain continued projects of culture of peace in schools.

According to the specialist, teachers have to understand that student violence may be the result of direct violence (physical, psychological, sexual, media) or structural violence (poverty, misery). “If the student learns to reproduce the culture of violence, he can also learn a culture of peace,” he said. He also stressed that peace does not mean the absence of conflict, but a way of dealing with conflicts. In addition, he stressed that promoting the culture of peace in schools was included as a goal of the National Education Plan (2014-2024).

According to the specialist, teachers have to understand that student violence may be the result of direct violence (physical, psychological, sexual, media) or structural violence (poverty, misery). “If the student learns to reproduce the culture of violence, he can also learn a culture of peace,” he said. He also stressed that peace does not mean the absence of conflict, but a way of dealing with conflicts. In addition, he stressed that promoting the culture of peace in schools was included as a goal of the National Education Plan (2014-2024).

(Thank you to Helena Lorenzo, the CPNN reporter for this article.)

(Click here for the original article in Portuguese)

Mexico: Congress Exhorts the City Councils to contribute to the culture of peace

.. DEMOCRATIC PARTICIPATION ..

An article from Guerrero Quadratin (translation by CPNN)

The Congress of Guerrero has exhorted the 81 city councils in the state to apply actions, programs and proposals to create a culture of peace and non-violence in their territories, in order to reduce the high rates of crime.

According to the Congress bulletin, when reading the proposal of the MC Parliamentary Group, the deputy Julio César Bernal Reséndiz highlighted that 2017 was one of the most violent in recent years, which makes it imperative that the three levels of government implement such actions.

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(Click here for a version in Spanish)

Questions for this article:

How can culture of peace be developed at the municipal level?

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He said that although municipal councils lack the infrastructure, budget and financing to contain violence in their municipalities, they do have channels for administrative, management and social participation that can hellp create a climate of peace in their territories.

Some of the actions and programs that are proposed include: create public policies of the municipalities that promote a culture of peace and nonviolence; disseminate through the municipal media the activities of local groups and the preparation of an annual program of awareness-raising activities to promote the values ​​of a culture of peace and non-violence; and make available publications on peace issues for libraries and municipal documentation centers.

Also, they should promote education for peace in schools, offering resources for students and facilitating specific training in peace and human rights for teachers, and budget an economic contribution for programs, projects and activities that promote the culture of peace organized by civil society.

Bernal Reséndiz emphasized that if each and every one of the aforementioned actions is carried out in the municipalities that make up the state of Guerrero, awareness will be created among the inhabitants to achieve peace and social harmony.

Mapping Youth Involvement in Colombia’s Peace Process

. . FREE FLOW OF INFORMATION . .

An article from Search for Common Ground

In collaboration with USAID’s Program of Alliances for Reconciliation, our most recent report, Peacebuilding in Colombia: A Youth Perspective, maps the current landscape of youth leaders and youth-led organizations in post-conflict Colombia. It also examines their potential in playing a key role to drive positive social change.

Too often, in post-conflict environments, youth perspectives are ignored or undervalued. To promote youth inclusion in Colombia, we employed our innovative Youth Mapping Methodology, which allowed us to better understand how they use their influence within their communities. Overall, we collected information from 391 youth in 21 municipalities.

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Question related to this article:

What is happening in Colombia, Is peace possible?

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The key findings shed light on various aspects of youth participation, including the demographic makeup of youth leadership and youth-led organizations, the range of activities conducted by these organizations, and the operational and societal challenges faced by these groups, among others. 91% of the youth indicated that they are ready to leave the past behind and are open to dialogue with those different from them. Based on the youth mapping findings, we make four recommendations promoting ways to better incorporate youth into the peacebuilding process.

Download the full policy brief to learn more:

Full Report – English

Highlights – English

Full Report – Spanish

Highlights – Spanish

Latin American mayors meet in Costa Rica for development goals

. . SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT . .

An article from La Vanguardia (translated by CPNN and reprinted without commercial ends)

Mayors of Ibero-America will meet this Thursday and Friday [April 18-19] in Costa Rica to celebrate the XVIII General Assembly of the Union of Capital Cities (UCCI) seeking to advance in the fulfillment of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDG).

The organization will define its strategy for the 2018-2020 biennium in order to determine how its members can continue to advance in the local implementation of the SDGs.

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(Click here for the Spanish version)

Question related to this article:

Can cities take the lead for sustainable development?

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A total of 23 international delegations from capital cities will attend the event in San José, including the mayor of Madrid, Manuela Carmena.

According to the organizers, initiatives linked to institutional strengthening, social development, local economic development, sustainable urban development, culture and communication will be addressed, as well as cross-cutting issues such as gender, environmental sustainability, culture of peace, innovation and human rights.

One of the main priorities for the coming period is the incorporation of culture as a strategic area in the organization, since the cultural dimension is fundamental to achieve more just, supportive and sustainable societies.

The Assembly will also present a management report (2016-2018) and an economic balance and will propose the definition of a strategic framework to achieve the effective implementation of the SDGs in Ibero-American cities.

The General Assembly of the UCCI meets every two years and that of 2018 is the second to be held after the cycle change that the organization approved in 2016.

The mayor of San José, Johnny Araya, will participate in the meeting; as well as the mayor of San Salvador, Nayib Bukele; the mayor of Panama City, José Blandón; the mayor of La Paz, Luis Revilla; and the mayor of Montevideo, Daniel Martínez, among others.

The opening ceremony will be attended by the president of Costa Rica, Luis Guillermo Solís, and the head of the Ibero-American General Secretariat, Rebeca Grynspan.

Bolivia calls for the preservation of South America as a zone of peace free of nuclear weapons

. . FREE FLOW OF INFORMATION . .

An article from Sputnik News

On assuming the temporary presidency of the Union of South American Nations (UNASUR), the president of Bolivia, Evo Morales, has called for the preservation of South America as a zone of peace, free of the war dangers that affect other parts of the world.

“This is the second time we have assumed the responsibility to coordinate work with countries throughout South America, and Bolivia’s great desire is for South America to be a zone of peace,” said President Evo Morales at the Government Palace.

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(Click here for the original Spanish version of this article)

Question related to this article:

Latin America, has it taken the lead in the struggle for a culture of peace?

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The Bolivian leader, in a statement through state media, said he also intended that Unasur coordinate with the European Union on issues such as development planning, legislation and common citizenship.

“We propose to build a South American identity in terms of defense, to consolidate the region as a zone of peace, free of nuclear weapons and of mass destruction, rejecting war, promoting disarmament and the peaceful resolution of conflicts and the culture of peace in the world,” he said, concerning the main objective of his temporary regional presidency.

Morales succeeds his Argentine counterpart Maurio Macri in the pro tempore presidency of UNASUR, an organization created in 2008 and whose first important resolution was to support the Bolivian president that same year in the face of a wave of political and regional protests that apparently sought to remove him from power.

More here: President of Bolivia says that the main threat to peace is the US Government

The president said that UNASUR has effectively acted in favor of the peaceful settlement of disputes, supporting negotiations between the Government of Colombia and rebel armed groups in that country, following the logic that “peace is built with social justice.”

Dominican Republic: Integrating art subjects in centers helps create a culture of peace

. . . EDUCATION FOR PEACE . . .

An article from Hoy digital (translation by CPNN)

The anthropologist Tahira Vargas considers expelling students from educational centers because of bad conduct does not solve the problem, but it aggravates it, For this reason she suggests to work with these students through theater, dance and music, in order to build a culture of peace.

“To break the cycle of violence you should not answer with more violence. Instead you need to change the relationships within the centers, creating other types of spaces, where you can dialogue with students and establish responsibilities and tasks that promote a change of behavior,” she said.

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(Click here for the original Spanish version of this article.)

Question for this article:

Do the arts create a basis for a culture of peace?, What is, or should be, their role in our movement?

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She explained that the teachers and directors of the centers do not understand the context of vulnerability that violent students experience, such as the case when their parents have to go out to work and cannot be at home to help educate their children.

Vargas spoke about the issue when asked about the statements of directors and teachers of high schools in Salcedo, who have alerted the Ministry of Education about the constant misconduct of many students.

Vargas points out that the streets and schools are the main space for the socialization of young people, so schools should be a space for building a culture of peace, not a space for the reproduction of violence, and for exclusion which is a form of violence.

“What I suggest is that teachers, principals and counselors work with students to change the internal relations of the center, and they are responsible for their behavior.” They should understand that it is important to integrate art, which is a strategy used in many countries to transform violent behavior into a culture of peace.

Children from Cauca, Córdoba and Bogotá will participate in Cinema Solidario of the UNICEF School of Peace

. . FREE FLOW OF INFORMATION . .

An article from Radio Santa Fe (translation by CPNN)

Next Monday, April 16 from 9 a.m. UNICEF will work in partnership with the Union of Bilingual Schools (UCB) on the Cinema Solidario initiative.

9,000 students from 16 schools in Bogotá, 300 children from 4 schools in the department of Córdoba and the New Vision Educational Institution of Honduras located in Buenos Aires (Cauca) will participate, involving 35 children and adolescents; They will receive the visit of Goodwill Ambassador Belky Arizala, who will be the facilitator and leader of the day.


Photo: Radio Santa Fe CM

The “Schools in Peace” strategy throughout the country benefits 11,884 students, 614 teachers, 4,380 families, 106 educational agents and 6 community councils. It is a pedagogical proposal led by UNICEF that creates, develops and consolidates learning communities around the construction of a culture of peace in educational and community contexts that have been affected by the armed conflict in Colombia. Currently, this promotes knowledge, skills and attitudes that generate changes in the behavior of children, adolescents, youth and adults to resolve conflicts peacefully, create participatory learning environments for coexistence and democracy and link pedagogies to prevent new conflicts and forms of violence at the interpersonal, social and structural levels.

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(Click here for the original Spanish version of this article)

Question related to this article:

What is happening in Colombia, Is peace possible?

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“For UNICEF, it is important that schools have spaces where children from different regions of the country can participate, express their points of view; argue and debate their opinions. It is essential for them to train in democracy and citizenship. Respect for difference, constructive dialogue and peaceful coexistence build a culture of PEACE, “says Frederick Spielberg, UNICEF OIC Deputy Representative.

Solidarity Cinema will be made under the cinema-forum methodology, because through it, UNICEF seeks to promote reflection and exchange of school initiatives around the construction of peace, human rights and coexistence in the school and community environment, through the participation of girls and boys.

The day will feature five (5) key moments for girls and boys, which are:

1. Reflection, exchange and dialogues will be generated among students around the construction of peace, coexistence and human rights with cultural and territorial diversity.

2. A brief review of the film will be shared and the context in which it is developed will be explained.

3. The movie “Whale Rider” will be screened.

4. Belky Arizala, UNICEF Goodwill Ambassador will share with the students and motivate their participation through questions, which will motivate the discussion and reflection on children’s rights.

5. At the end, the students will be organized by groups and will share their experience during the Cinema Solidario and they will make an artistic show for the educational community.

According to Mauricio Castaño, Executive Director of UCB: “The partnership with UNICEF has been very relevant for the UCB. These activities, such as the film forum, have allowed our students to know other realities, be aware of the rights of children and develop leadership skills and social entrepreneurship.”

Belize and Guatemala host Garifuna Cultural Event

. TOLERANCE & SOLIDARITY .

An article from the Belize Guardian

A two-day event, from April 8th to 9th, was held in Guatemala City. There, Belize and Guatemala, together, held “The Belizean and Guatemalan Garifuna Culture as an Expression of Social Cohesion, Intercultural Dialogue and Promotion of Peace.” The aim of the event was to promote intercultural dialogue and a culture of peace.

The event consisted of both cultural and academic presentations which were meant to showcase the historical coexistence of the communities living on the borders of Livingston and Puerto Barrios, Izabal, Guatemala, and the Toledo and Stann Creek Districts of Belize. The program had the full support of UNESCO, the OAS, the Konrad Adenauer Stiftung Foundation, the Garifuna Council of Belize, and CODIRSA – the Presidential Commission against Discrimination and Racism of Guatemala.

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Question related to this article:

Solidarity across national borders, What are some good examples?>

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During the cultural presentations, the Garifuna groups Lirahunu Satuye of Dangriga Town and Luwaruguma Guifu of Livingston, Guatemala, performed in venues located in some of Guatemala City’s busiest outdoor centers, attracting large audiences.  In addition to individual country performances, both groups collaborated in joint performances showcasing a celebration of unity through culture.

The program also included an academic conference which consisted of presentations by experts of both countries.  Presenters from Belize included the President of the Belize National Garifuna Council, Sandra Miranda, Roy Cayetano, and Sebastian Cayetano.  Experts from Guatemala included Alfonso Arrivillaga, Dr. Gutberto Leiva, and Olivia Núñez.  The presentations reflected on the history, culture, and traditions of the Garinagu people.

Guatemala and Belize share great cultural, ecological, and patrimonial richness. Both nations are making the necessary efforts to resolve their historical territorial differences within the framework of the United Nations and International Law, seeking a lasting and peaceful solution to their dispute.

The event was organized through the joint efforts of the Embassy of Belize in Guatemala, Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Guatemala, UNESCO office in Kingston accredited to Belize, and the UNESCO office in Guatemala.

Mexico: Monterrey Installs Municipal Council of Social Prevention of Violence

.. DEMOCRATIC PARTICIPATION ..

An article from Posta (translation by CPNN)

As of this Thursday [March 22], the municipality of Monterrey has a Municipal Council for the Social Prevention of Violence and Crime comprised of representatives of academia, society and the business sector, as well as municipal officials. It will be responsible for coordinating public policies and coordinating with other government bodies on the issue of prevention of violence.

Mayor Adrián de la Garza addressed the Council, saying that, among its faculties, the members should formulate plans, programs and actions for the prevention of violence and crime and should start a diagnosis of the causes that generate this problem and evaluate the social impact of the plans they carry out, in addition to promoting training in this area.

“Reacting after violence has occurred may help to lower some incidence, and provide some feeling of justice, but in reality it does not alleviate the problem. What society is looking for that there is less violence, that there is less insecurity, that there is less criminal incidence. The key to this is preventive actions”, he emphasized.

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(Click here for the Spanish original of this article)

Questions for this article:

How can culture of peace be developed at the municipal level?

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After the Council took up the initiative, a collaboration agreement was signed with the Civil Association RENACE, to implement the project of “Psychosocial support to adolescents in conflict with the Law” with which they will give advice to young people detained for administrative offenses.
In addition, the group will support the Council to identify antisocial behavior and its causes, to generate preventive actions, to develop operating rules to achieve the objectives and to measure results.

* Pearl Leticia Guadalupe Montemayor García, Director of Citizen Services of the Center for Citizen Integration (CIC)
* Rosa Nelly Pérez Mares, Regional Coordinator of Youth Services A.C. (SERAJ)
* María del Consuelo Bañuelos Lozano, Director of Peace Promotion. Martín Carlos Sánchez Bocanegra, General Director of RENACE, A. B. P.
* Silvia Camarillo Vázquez, Director of the Monterrey Operational Unit of Youth Integration Centers A.C. (CIJ)

The Counselors of the academic community are:

* Juan García Rodríguez, Criminology Coordinator of the Faculty of Law and Criminology of the UANL [Universidad Autónoma de Nuevo León].
* Julia Leticia Neira Tijerina, Director of Management of the Urban Environment, Purísima-Alameda District of U-Erre
* Karla Guadalupe Samaniego Pérez, Coordinator of the Faculty of Law and Legal Sciences of the Metropolitan University of Monterrey.
* Rogelio Manuel Cortés Leal, Director of Citizen Planning of ITESM [Monterrey Institute of Technology and Higher Education]
* Julio César Treviño Leal, Professor at the José Martí University of Latin America.

Directors of the business sector:

* Dimas Padrón, In charge of Vial and Patrimonial affairs of Arca Continental S.A.B de C.V.
* Deassy Daniela Juangorena Hernández, Special Projects Advisor of the Senda Group.
* Reynaldo Osorio Fernández, National Head of Labor and Patrimonial Protection of OXXO.
* Estefany Elizabeth Mercado Cortés, Regional Manager of Human Resources of SEARS.
* César Alejandro Villarreal Treviño, president of the National Chamber of the Restaurant Industry and Seasoned Foods (CANIRAC)

(Thanks to Rogelio Cortés, the CPNN reporter for this article).